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China's hog production: From backyard to large-scale

Author

Listed:
  • Qiao, Fangbin
  • Huang, Jikun
  • Wang, Dan
  • Liu, Huaiju
  • Lohmar, Bryan

Abstract

China's hog production has undergone significant structural transition, from the traditional backyard production mode to the large-scale production mode. In this study, we illustrate the linkage between economic development and the transition in hog production mode. Using unique and nationally representative survey data, we find that an increase in farmer wealth motivates them to transition away from backyard hog production. However, the relationship between wealth and herd size among large-scale hog producers is positive. With farmer wealth increasing rapidly, the transition of China's hog production toward the large-scale mode is expected to continue; this will have significant implications for not only hog production, but also the feed sector and many other related sectors.

Suggested Citation

  • Qiao, Fangbin & Huang, Jikun & Wang, Dan & Liu, Huaiju & Lohmar, Bryan, 2016. "China's hog production: From backyard to large-scale," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 38(C), pages 199-208.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:chieco:v:38:y:2016:i:c:p:199-208
    DOI: 10.1016/j.chieco.2016.02.003
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Quah, Danny, 1993. "Empirical cross-section dynamics in economic growth," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 37(2-3), pages 426-434, April.
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    4. Rosenzweig, Mark R & Wolpin, Kenneth I, 1993. "Credit Market Constraints, Consumption Smoothing, and the Accumulation of Durable Production Assets in Low-Income Countries: Investment in Bullocks in India," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 101(2), pages 223-244, April.
    5. Yu, Xiaohua & Abler, David, 2014. "Where have all the pigs gone? Inconsistencies in pork statistics in China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 30(C), pages 469-484.
    6. Fangbin Qiao & Jing Chen & Colin Carter & Jikun Huang & Scott Rozelle, 2011. "Market Development And The Rise And Fall Of Backyard Hog Production In China," The Developing Economies, Institute of Developing Economies, vol. 49(2), pages 203-222, June.
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    Cited by:

    1. Xiaoheng Zhang & Feng Chu & Xiaohua Yu & Yingheng Zhou & Xu Tian & Xianhui Geng & Jinyang Yang, 2017. "Changing Structure and Sustainable Development for China’s Hog Sector," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 9(1), pages 1-15, January.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Farmer wealth; Backyard hog producers; Large-scale hog producers; Structural change; China;

    JEL classification:

    • O53 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - Asia including Middle East
    • Q12 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - Micro Analysis of Farm Firms, Farm Households, and Farm Input Markets
    • Q13 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - Agricultural Markets and Marketing; Cooperatives; Agribusiness

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