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Long-term reduction of nitrogen fertilizer use through knowledge training in rice production in China

Author

Listed:
  • Huang, Jikun
  • Huang, Zhurong
  • Jia, Xiangping
  • Hu, Ruifa
  • Xiang, Cheng

Abstract

Nitrogen (N) fertilizer has been excessively used in China's crop production, resulting in nonpoint pollution and significant greenhouse gas emissions. Previous studies show that farmers can reduce N-fertilizer upon receiving knowledge training. However, there is little evidence of the effectiveness of this effort in the long term. Based on an experimental study of site-specific nutrient management for rice production in China and a unique household dataset captured over seven years, this study shows that the traditional training approach has not been effective in reducing Chinese farmers' N-fertilizer use. Persistently reducing farmers' excessive use of N-fertilizer in the long term will require intensive in-field guidance – something that requires substantial investment and institutional innovation.

Suggested Citation

  • Huang, Jikun & Huang, Zhurong & Jia, Xiangping & Hu, Ruifa & Xiang, Cheng, 2015. "Long-term reduction of nitrogen fertilizer use through knowledge training in rice production in China," Agricultural Systems, Elsevier, vol. 135(C), pages 105-111.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:agisys:v:135:y:2015:i:c:p:105-111
    DOI: 10.1016/j.agsy.2015.01.004
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Heisey, Paul W. & Norton, George W., 2007. "Fertilizers and other farm chemicals," Handbook of Agricultural Economics, in: Robert Evenson & Prabhu Pingali (ed.), Handbook of Agricultural Economics, edition 1, volume 3, chapter 53, pages 2741-2777, Elsevier.
    2. Madhu Khanna, 2001. "Sequential Adoption of Site-Specific Technologies and its Implications for Nitrogen Productivity: A Double Selectivity Model," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 83(1), pages 35-51.
    3. Huang, Jikun & Wang, Xiaobing & Zhi, Huayong & Huang, Zhurong & Rozelle, Scott, 2011. "Subsidies and distortions in China’s agriculture: evidence from producer-level data," Australian Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society, vol. 55(1), pages 1-19.
    4. Ma, Wenqi & Li, Jianhui & Ma, Lin & Wang, Fanghao & Sisák, István & Cushman, Gregory & Zhang, Fusuo, 2008. "Nitrogen flow and use efficiency in production and utilization of wheat, rice, and maize in China," Agricultural Systems, Elsevier, vol. 99(1), pages 53-63, December.
    5. Hu, Ruifa & Cao, Jianmin & Huang, Jikun & Peng, Shaobing & Huang, Jianliang & Zhong, Xuhua & Zou, Yingbin & Yang, Jianchang & Buresh, Roland J., 2007. "Farmer participatory testing of standard and modified site-specific nitrogen management for irrigated rice in China," Agricultural Systems, Elsevier, vol. 94(2), pages 331-340, May.
    6. HU, Ruifa & YANG, Zhijian & KELLY, Peter & HUANG, Jikun, 2009. "Agricultural extension system reform and agent time allocation in China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 20(2), pages 303-315, June.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Zhang, C. & Sun, Y. & Hu, R., 2018. "Does urban-rural income inequality increase agricultural fertilizer or pesticide use? A provincial panel data analysis in China," 2018 Conference, July 28-August 2, 2018, Vancouver, British Columbia 277033, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    2. Pan, Dan & Zhang, Ning, 2018. "The Role of Agricultural Training on Fertilizer Use Knowledge: A Randomized Controlled Experiment," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 148(C), pages 77-91.
    3. Wang, Mengru & Ma, Lin & Strokal, Maryna & Chu, Yanan & Kroeze, Carolien, 2018. "Exploring nutrient management options to increase nitrogen and phosphorus use efficiencies in food production of China," Agricultural Systems, Elsevier, vol. 163(C), pages 58-72.
    4. He, Wentian & Jiang, Rong & He, Ping & Yang, Jingyi & Zhou, Wei & Ma, Jinchuan & Liu, Yingxia, 2018. "Estimating soil nitrogen balance at regional scale in China’s croplands from 1984 to 2014," Agricultural Systems, Elsevier, vol. 167(C), pages 125-135.

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