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Understanding the process of agricultural technology adoption: mineral fertilizer in eastern DR Congo

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  • Lambrecht, Isabel
  • Vanlauwe, Bernard
  • Merckx, Roel
  • Maertens, Miet

Abstract

While there is a large literature on agricultural technology adoption, evidence from the poorest countries is still lacking and the decision-making process of farmers is still poorly understood. We empirically analyze mineral fertilizer adoption among poor and food insecure smallholder farmers in South-Kivu, eastern DR Congo, after its introduction by a research and extension program. We disentangle the adoption process in an awareness step, a tryout decision, and a continued adoption decision. We show that variables commonly used to explain agricultural technology adoption, and the different program interventions, have a different impact on the different steps in the adoption process.

Suggested Citation

  • Lambrecht, Isabel & Vanlauwe, Bernard & Merckx, Roel & Maertens, Miet, 2013. "Understanding the process of agricultural technology adoption: mineral fertilizer in eastern DR Congo," Working Papers 157388, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Centre for Agricultural and Food Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:kucawp:157388
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    References listed on IDEAS

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