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Do Fertilizer Subsidies Improve Soil Quality: Myopic vs. Dynamic Analysis of Smallholder Farmers in Ghana

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  • Van Asselt, Joanna
  • Grogan, Kelly A.

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  • Van Asselt, Joanna & Grogan, Kelly A., 2020. "Do Fertilizer Subsidies Improve Soil Quality: Myopic vs. Dynamic Analysis of Smallholder Farmers in Ghana," 2020 Annual Meeting, July 26-28, Kansas City, Missouri 304546, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:aaea20:304546
    DOI: 10.22004/ag.econ.304546
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Jayne, T. S. & Govereh, J. & Wanzala, M. & Demeke, M., 2003. "Fertilizer market development: a comparative analysis of Ethiopia, Kenya, and Zambia," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 28(4), pages 293-316, August.
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    4. Paswel P. Marenya & Christopher B. Barrett, 2009. "State-conditional Fertilizer Yield Response on Western Kenyan Farms," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 91(4), pages 991-1006.
    5. Nicole M. Mason & Thomas S. Jayne, 2014. "Fertiliser subsidies and smallholder commercial fertiliser purchases: crowding out, leakage, and policy implications for Zambia," Journal of Agricultural Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 65(2), pages 527-528, June.
    6. Chirwa, Ephraim & Dorward, Andrew, 2013. "Agricultural Input Subsidies: The Recent Malawi Experience," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780199683529.
    7. Lambrecht, Isabel & Vanlauwe, Bernard & Merckx, Roel & Maertens, Miet, 2014. "Understanding the Process of Agricultural Technology Adoption: Mineral Fertilizer in Eastern DR Congo," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 59(C), pages 132-146.
    8. Abebaw, Degnet & Haile, Mekbib G., 2013. "The impact of cooperatives on agricultural technology adoption: Empirical evidence from Ethiopia," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 38(C), pages 82-91.
    9. Segarra, Eduardo & Taylor, Daniel B., 1987. "Farm Level Dynamic Analysis Of Soil Conservation: An Application To The Piedmont Area Of Virginia," Southern Journal of Agricultural Economics, Southern Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 19(2), pages 1-13, December.
    10. Burke, William J. & Frossard, Emmanuel & Kabwe, Stephen & Jayne, Thom S., 2019. "Understanding fertilizer adoption and effectiveness on maize in Zambia," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 86(C), pages 1-1.
    11. Paswel P. Marenya & Christopher B. Barrett, 2009. "Soil quality and fertilizer use rates among smallholder farmers in western Kenya," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 40(5), pages 561-572, September.
    12. Vondolia, Godwin Kofi & Eggert, Håkan & Stage, Jesper, "undated". "Nudging Boserup? The Impact of Fertilizer Subsidies on Investment in Soil and Water Conservation," Discussion Papers dp-12-08-efd, Resources For the Future.
    13. Madhu Khanna, 2001. "Sequential Adoption of Site-Specific Technologies and its Implications for Nitrogen Productivity: A Double Selectivity Model," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 83(1), pages 35-51.
    14. T.S. Jayne & David Mather & Nicole Mason & Jacob Ricker-Gilbert, 2013. "How do fertilizer subsidy programs affect total fertilizer use in sub-Saharan Africa? Crowding out, diversion, and benefit/cost assessments," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 44(6), pages 687-703, November.
    15. Andre Croppenstedt & Mulat Demeke & Meloria M. Meschi, 2003. "Technology Adoption in the Presence of Constraints: the Case of Fertilizer Demand in Ethiopia," Review of Development Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 7(1), pages 58-70, February.
    16. Kelly, Valerie A. & Crawford, Eric W. & Ricker-Gilbert, Jacob, 2011. "The New Generation of African Fertilizer Subsidies: Panacea or Pandora’s Box?," Food Security International Development Policy Syntheses 107460, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    17. Mkwara, Bentry, 2013. "To what extent do fertiliser subsidies improve household income and reduce poverty? The case of Malawi," African Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, African Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 8(4), pages 1-12, October.
    18. Mateusz Filipski & J. Edward Taylor, 2012. "A simulation impact evaluation of rural income transfers in Malawi and Ghana," Journal of Development Effectiveness, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 4(1), pages 109-129, March.
    19. Bart Minten & Bethlehem Koru & David Stifel, 2013. "The last mile(s) in modern input distribution: Pricing, profitability, and adoption," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 44(6), pages 629-646, November.
    20. Antti Iho, 2010. "Spatially optimal steady-state phosphorus policies in crop production," European Review of Agricultural Economics, Foundation for the European Review of Agricultural Economics, vol. 37(2), pages 187-208, June.
    21. Marenya, Paswel Phiri & Barrett, Christopher B., 2009. "The effect of soil quality on fertilizer use rates among smallholder farmers in western Kenya," 2009 Conference, August 16-22, 2009, Beijing, China 51671, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    22. Michael Morris & Valerie A. Kelly & Ron J. Kopicki & Derek Byerlee, 2007. "Fertilizer Use in African Agriculture : Lessons Learned and Good Practice Guidelines," World Bank Publications - Books, The World Bank Group, number 6650.
    23. Minot, Nicholas & Benson, Todd, 2009. "Fertilizer subsidies in Africa: Are vouchers the answer?," Issue briefs 60, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    24. Satya N. Yadav, 1997. "Dynamic Optimization of Nitrogen Use When Groundwater Contamination Is Internalized at the Standard in the Long Run," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 79(3), pages 931-945.
    25. Oscar R. Burt, 1981. "Farm Level Economics of Soil Conservation in the Palouse Area of the Northwest," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 63(1), pages 83-92.
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