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Towards A Sustainable Soil Fertility Strategy In Ghana

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Listed:
  • Jayne, Thomas
  • Kolavalli, Shashidhara
  • Debrah, Kofi
  • Ariga, Joshua
  • Brunache, Pierre
  • Kabaghe, Change
  • Nunez-Rodriguez, Walter
  • Owusu Baah, Kwaku
  • Bationo, Andre A.
  • Jeroen Huising, Elzo
  • Lambrecht, Isabel
  • Diao, Xinshen
  • Yeboah, Felix
  • Benin, Samuel
  • Andam, Kwaw

Abstract

Most efforts to raise fertilizer use in SSA over the past decade have focused on fertilizer subsidies and targeted credit programmes with hopes that these programmes could later be withdrawn once the profitability of fertilizer use has been made clear to adopting farmers and once they have become sufficiently capitalized to be able to afford fertilizer on their own. This line of reasoning under-emphasizes the evidence that many smallholder farmers obtain very low crop response rates to inorganic fertilizer application and hence cannot use it profitably at full market prices. A central hypothesis of this study is that Ghanaian farmers will demand increasing quantities of fertilizer when they can utilize it more profitably, and that doing so will require improved agronomic and soil management practices that enable farmers to achieve higher crop response rates to fertilizer application.

Suggested Citation

  • Jayne, Thomas & Kolavalli, Shashidhara & Debrah, Kofi & Ariga, Joshua & Brunache, Pierre & Kabaghe, Change & Nunez-Rodriguez, Walter & Owusu Baah, Kwaku & Bationo, Andre A. & Jeroen Huising, Elzo & La, 2015. "Towards A Sustainable Soil Fertility Strategy In Ghana," Feed the Future Innovation Lab for Food Security Policy Research Papers 258733, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics, Feed the Future Innovation Lab for Food Security (FSP).
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:miffrp:258733
    DOI: 10.22004/ag.econ.258733
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    File URL: https://ageconsearch.umn.edu/record/258733/files/FSP%20Research%20Paper%203.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Chibwana, Christopher & Fisher, Monica & Shively, Gerald, 2012. "Cropland Allocation Effects of Agricultural Input Subsidies in Malawi," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 40(1), pages 124-133.
    2. Snapp, Sieg & Jayne, Thomas S. & Mhango, Wezi & Benson, Todd & Ricker-Gilbert, Jacob, 2014. "Maize yield response to nitrogen in Malawi’s smallholder production systems," MaSSP working papers 9, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    3. Powlson, D.S. & Gregory, P.J. & Whalley, W.R. & Quinton, J.N. & Hopkins, D.W. & Whitmore, A.P. & Hirsch, P.R. & Goulding, K.W.T., 2011. "Soil management in relation to sustainable agriculture and ecosystem services," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 36(Supplemen), pages 72-87, January.
    4. Paswel P. Marenya & Christopher B. Barrett, 2009. "State-conditional Fertilizer Yield Response on Western Kenyan Farms," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 91(4), pages 991-1006.
    5. Chirwa, Ephraim & Dorward, Andrew, 2013. "Agricultural Input Subsidies: The Recent Malawi Experience," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780199683529.
    6. Powlson, D.S. & Gregory, P.J. & Whalley, W.R. & Quinton, J.N. & Hopkins, D.W. & Whitmore, A.P. & Hirsch, P.R. & Goulding, K.W.T., 2011. "Soil management in relation to sustainable agriculture and ecosystem services," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 36(S1), pages 72-87.
    7. Xinshen Diao & Daniel B. Sarpong, 2011. "Poverty Implications of Agricultural Land Degradation in Ghana: An Economy-wide, Multimarket Model Assessment," African Development Review, African Development Bank, vol. 23(3), pages 263-275.
    8. Snapp, Sieg & Jayne, T.S. & Mhango, Wezi & Ricker-Gilbert, Jacob, 2014. "Maize Yield Response to Nitrogen in Malawi’s Smallholder Production Systems," Food Security Collaborative Working Papers 188570, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    9. Liverpool-Tasie, Lenis Saweda O. & Ogunleye,Wale Olatunji & Omonona,Bolarin Titus & Sanou,Awa & Liverpool-Tasie, Lenis Saweda O. & Ogunleye,Wale Olatunji & Omonona,Bolarin Titus & Sanou,Awa, 2015. "Is increasing inorganic fertilizer use in Sub-Saharan Africa a profitable proposition ? evidence from Nigeria," Policy Research Working Paper Series 7201, The World Bank.
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    Keywords

    Productivity Analysis;

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