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Agricultural Input Subsidy Programs in Africa: An Assessment of Recent Evidence

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  • Jayne, T.S.
  • Mason, Nicole M.
  • Burke, William J.
  • Ariga, Joshua

Abstract

This study reviews the evidence regarding the recent wave of smart input subsidy programs in Africa and identifies components of a holistic and sustainable agricultural productivity growth strategy that could improve the contribution of input subsidy programs to African governments’ national development objectives.

Suggested Citation

  • Jayne, T.S. & Mason, Nicole M. & Burke, William J. & Ariga, Joshua, 2016. "Agricultural Input Subsidy Programs in Africa: An Assessment of Recent Evidence," Food Security International Development Working Papers 245892, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:midiwp:245892
    DOI: 10.22004/ag.econ.245892
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    Cited by:

    1. Resnick, Danielle & Mather, David & Mason, Nicole & Ndyetabula, Daniel, 2017. "What Drives Agricultural Input Subsidy Reform in Africa? Applying the Kaleidoscope Model of Food Security Policy Change," Feed the Future Innovation Lab for Food Security Policy Research Briefs 260419, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics, Feed the Future Innovation Lab for Food Security (FSP).
    2. Liverpool-Tasie, Lenis Saweda O. & Jayne, Thomas & Muyanga, Milu & Sanou, Awa, 2017. "Are African Farmers Experiencing Improved Incentives To Use Fertilizer?," Feed the Future Innovation Lab for Food Security Policy Research Papers 270632, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics, Feed the Future Innovation Lab for Food Security (FSP).
    3. Melkani, Aakanksha, 2018. "Significance of Risk Mitigation for Creating an Enabling Environment for Agricultural Policy Implementation in Sub-Saharan Africa," 2018 Annual Meeting, August 5-7, Washington, D.C. 273843, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    4. Mather, David L., 2016. "Page 1 of 16 Lessons learned from private sector -friendly input subsidy programs in Tanzania and Ghana," Food Security Collaborative Working Papers 266419, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    5. Jayne, T.S. & Sitko, Nicholas J. & Mason, Nicole M., 2017. "Can Input Subsidy Programs Contribute To Climate Smart Agriculture?," Feed the Future Innovation Lab for Food Security Policy Research Papers 270626, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics, Feed the Future Innovation Lab for Food Security (FSP).

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    Agricultural and Food Policy; International Development;

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