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Disrupting Demand for Commercial Seed: Input Subsidies in Malawi and Zambia

  • Mason, Nicole M.
  • Ricker-Gilbert, Jacob

This study uses nationally representative household-level panel data from Malawi and Zambia to identify the determinants of subsidized maize seed and fertilizer receipt, and to estimate how input subsidies affect households’ commercial purchases of improved maize seed varieties. In both countries we find that households in areas where the ruling party won the last presidential election acquire significantly more subsidized inputs than other households. Results also indicate that each additional kilogram of subsidized maize seed acquired by a household reduces its commercial improved maize seed purchases by 0.58kg in Malawi and by 0.49kg in Zambia on average.

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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal World Development.

Volume (Year): 45 (2013)
Issue (Month): C ()
Pages: 75-91

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Handle: RePEc:eee:wdevel:v:45:y:2013:i:c:p:75-91
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/worlddev

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  1. Jayne, T. S. & Govereh, J. & Mwanaumo, A. & Nyoro, J. K. & Chapoto, A., 2002. "False Promise or False Premise? The Experience of Food and Input Market Reform in Eastern and Southern Africa," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 30(11), pages 1967-1985, November.
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  5. Chibwana, Christopher & Shively, Gerald & Fisher, Monica & Jumbe, Charles & Masters, William, 2014. "Measuring the impacts of Malawi’s farm input subsidy programme," African Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, African Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 9(2), April.
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  9. Smale, Melinda & Bellon, Mauricio R & Aguirre Gomez, Jose Alfonso, 2001. "Maize Diversity, Variety Attributes, and Farmers' Choices in Southeastern Guanajuato, Mexico," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 50(1), pages 201-25, October.
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  14. Dorward, Andrew & Chirwa, Ephraim & Kelly, Valerie A. & Jayne, Thomas S. & Slater, Rachel & Boughton, Duncan, 2008. "Evaluation Of The 2006/7 Agricultural Input Subsidy Programme, Malawi. Final Report," Food Security Collaborative Working Papers 97143, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
  15. Megill, David J., 2005. "Recommendations for Adjusting Weights for Zambia Post-Harvest Survey Data Series and Improving Estimation Methodology for Future Surveys," Food Security Collaborative Working Papers 54470, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
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