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Does Access to Storage Protectant Increase Smallholder Adoption of Improved Maize Seed? Insights from Malawi

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  • Ricker-Gilbert, Jacob
  • Jones, Michael

Abstract

To date there is limited knowledge on the role that post-harvest storage protectants, chemical or otherwise, play in a smallholder farmer’s decision to adopt of high-yielding improved maize varieties. This is a key issue because higher yielding varieties are often more susceptible to storage pests than lower yielding traditional varieties. We present novel evidence from Malawi which shows that access to storage chemicals has a positive and significant effect on both farmer adoption of improved seed and the area that households plant to improved maize. Results have important implications for input support programs because failing to account for small holder storage challenges may reduce a farmer’s incentive to adopt modern seed varieties that can enhance staple crop production and food security.

Suggested Citation

  • Ricker-Gilbert, Jacob & Jones, Michael, 2012. "Does Access to Storage Protectant Increase Smallholder Adoption of Improved Maize Seed? Insights from Malawi," 2012 Annual Meeting, August 12-14, 2012, Seattle, Washington 124658, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:aaea12:124658
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    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/124658
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Tavneet Suri, 2011. "Selection and Comparative Advantage in Technology Adoption," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 79(1), pages 159-209, January.
    2. Mason, Nicole M. & Ricker-Gilbert, Jacob, 2013. "Disrupting Demand for Commercial Seed: Input Subsidies in Malawi and Zambia," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 45(C), pages 75-91.
    3. Simtowe, Franklin, 2006. "Can Risk-aversion towards fertilizer explain part of the non-adoption puzzle for hybrid maize? Empirical evidence from Malawi," MPRA Paper 1241, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 20 Dec 2006.
    4. Vella, Francis, 1993. "A Simple Estimator for Simultaneous Models with Censored Endogenous Regressors," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 34(2), pages 441-457, May.
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    6. Franklin Simtowe & Manfred Zeller & Aliou Diagne, 2009. "The impact of credit constraints on the adoption of hybrid maize in Malawi," Review of Agricultural and Environmental Studies - Revue d'Etudes en Agriculture et Environnement, INRA Department of Economics, vol. 90(1), pages 5-22.
    7. World Bank, 2011. "Missing Food : The Case of Postharvest Grain Losses in Sub-Saharan Africa," World Bank Other Operational Studies 2824, The World Bank.
    8. Banful, Afua Branoah, 2010. "Old problems in the new solutions?," IFPRI discussion papers 1002, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    9. Smale, Melinda & Heisey, Paul W & Leathers, Howard D, 1995. "Maize of the Ancestors and Modern Varieties: The Microeconomics of High-Yielding Variety Adoption in Malawi," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 43(2), pages 351-368, January.
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    Keywords

    Agricultural and Food Policy; Crop Production/Industries; Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety;

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