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Impact of Improved Maize Adoption on Welfare of Farm Households in Malawi: A Panel Data Analysis

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  • Bezu, Sosina
  • Kassie, Girma T.
  • Shiferaw, Bekele
  • Ricker-Gilbert, Jacob

Abstract

This paper assesses rural households’ decision to use improved maize varieties in Malawi and examines its impact on household welfare using a three-year household panel data. The distributional effect of maize technology adoption is investigated by looking at impacts across wealth and gender groups. We applied control function approach and IV regression to control for possible endogeneity of input subsidy and area under improved maize. We found that area under improved maize varieties is positively correlated with own maize consumption, income and asset holdings. We found evidence that improved maize adoption has a stronger impact on welfare of poorer households.

Suggested Citation

  • Bezu, Sosina & Kassie, Girma T. & Shiferaw, Bekele & Ricker-Gilbert, Jacob, 2014. "Impact of Improved Maize Adoption on Welfare of Farm Households in Malawi: A Panel Data Analysis," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 59(C), pages 120-131.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:wdevel:v:59:y:2014:i:c:p:120-131
    DOI: 10.1016/j.worlddev.2014.01.023
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    Keywords

    improved maize; technology adoption; input subsidy; food security; Malawi; Africa;

    JEL classification:

    • I39 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - Other
    • O1 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development
    • O12 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Microeconomic Analyses of Economic Development
    • O33 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Technological Change: Choices and Consequences; Diffusion Processes
    • Q16 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - R&D; Agricultural Technology; Biofuels; Agricultural Extension Services
    • Q18 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - Agricultural Policy; Food Policy

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