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Can agricultural input subsidies reduce the gender gap in modern maize adoption? Evidence from Malawi

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  • Fisher, Monica
  • Kandiwa, Vongai

Abstract

Nationally representative data for Malawi were used to measure the gender gap in adoption of modern maize and to investigate how, if at all, Malawi’s Farm Input Subsidy Program (FISP) has impacted the gap. Regression results show the probability of adopting modern maize was 12% lower for wives in male-headed households, and 11% lower for female household heads, than for male farmers. Receipt of subsidized input coupons had no discernible effect on modern maize adoption for male farmers. Receiving a subsidy for both seed and fertilizer increased the probability of modern maize cultivation by 222% for female household heads, suggesting the FISP has likely reduced the gender gap in adoption of modern maize in Malawi.

Suggested Citation

  • Fisher, Monica & Kandiwa, Vongai, 2014. "Can agricultural input subsidies reduce the gender gap in modern maize adoption? Evidence from Malawi," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 45(C), pages 101-111.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jfpoli:v:45:y:2014:i:c:p:101-111
    DOI: 10.1016/j.foodpol.2014.01.007
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    2. Murendo, Conrad & Wollni, Meike & de Brauw, Alan & Mugabi, Nicholas, 2015. "Social network effects on mobile money adoption in Uganda," 2015 Conference, August 9-14, 2015, Milan, Italy 212514, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    3. Lambrecht, Isabel & Vanlauwe, Bernard & Maertens, Miet, 2014. "Agricultural extension in eastern DR Congo: Does Gender Matter?," 2014 International Congress, August 26-29, 2014, Ljubljana, Slovenia 182731, European Association of Agricultural Economists.
    4. Cheryl Doss, 2015. "Women and Agricultural Productivity: What Does the Evidence Tell Us?," Working Papers 1051, Economic Growth Center, Yale University.
    5. Lambrecht, Isabel & Vanlauwe, Bernard & Maertens, Miet, 2014. "What is the sense of gender targeting in agricultural extension programs? Evidence from eastern DR Congo," Working Papers 167158, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Centre for Agricultural and Food Economics.
    6. R. Wendy Karamba & Paul C. Winters, 2015. "Gender and agricultural productivity: implications of the Farm Input Subsidy Program in Malawi," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 46(3), pages 357-374, May.
    7. Mishra, Khushbu & Abdoul, Sam G. & Miranda, Mario J. & Diiro, Gracious M., 2015. "Gender and Dynamics of Technology Adoption: Evidence from Uganda," 2015 AAEA & WAEA Joint Annual Meeting, July 26-28, San Francisco, California 206550, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    8. Lunduka, Rodney & Ricker-Gilbert, Jacob & Shively, Gerald & Jayne, Thom, 2014. "Understanding and Improving FISP Targeting," Food Security Collaborative Policy Briefs 234943, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    9. Avila-Santamaria, Jorge J. & Useche, Maria P., 2016. "Urea Subsidies and the Decision to Allocate Land to a New Fertilizing Technology: Ex-ante Analysis in Ecuador," 2016 Annual Meeting, February 6-9, 2016, San Antonio, Texas 229851, Southern Agricultural Economics Association.
    10. Kpadonou, Rivaldo & Barbier, Bruno & Denton, Fatima & Owiyo, Tom, 2015. "Linkage between and determinants of organic fertilizer and modern varieties adoption in the Sahel," 2015 Conference, August 9-14, 2015, Milan, Italy 212016, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    11. Larson,Donald F. & Savastano,Sara & Murray,Siobhan & Palacios-Lopez,Amparo, 2015. "Are women less productive farmers ? how markets and risk affect fertilizer use, productivity, and measured gender effects in Uganda," Policy Research Working Paper Series 7241, The World Bank.
    12. repec:eee:jfpoli:v:69:y:2017:i:c:p:190-206 is not listed on IDEAS
    13. Muraoka, Rie & Matsumoto, Tomoya & Jin, Songqing & Otsuka, Keijiro, 2015. "On the Possibility of a Maize Green Revolution in the Highlands of Kenya: An Assessment of Emerging Intensive Farming Systems," 2015 Conference, August 9-14, 2015, Milan, Italy 212033, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    14. Graeub, Benjamin E. & Chappell, M. Jahi & Wittman, Hannah & Ledermann, Samuel & Kerr, Rachel Bezner & Gemmill-Herren, Barbara, 2016. "The State of Family Farms in the World," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 87(C), pages 1-15.
    15. Silvestre García de Jalón & Ana Iglesias & Andrew P. Barnes, 2016. "Drivers of farm-level adaptation to climate change in Africa: an evaluation by a composite index of potential adoption," Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change, Springer, vol. 21(5), pages 779-798, June.
    16. Asfaw, Solomon & Carraro, Alessandro, 2016. "Welfare Effect of Farm Input Subsidy Program in the Context of Climate Change: Evidence from Malawi," 2016 Fifth International Conference, September 23-26, 2016, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia 246281, African Association of Agricultural Economists (AAAE).
    17. Sibande, Lonester & Bailey, Alastair & Davidova, Sophia, 2017. "The impact of farm input subsidies on maize marketing in Malawi," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 69(C), pages 190-206.
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    21. repec:eee:jfpoli:v:75:y:2018:i:c:p:37-51 is not listed on IDEAS

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