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Can agricultural input subsidies reduce the gender gap in modern maize adoption? Evidence from Malawi

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  • Fisher, Monica
  • Kandiwa, Vongai

Abstract

Nationally representative data for Malawi were used to measure the gender gap in adoption of modern maize and to investigate how, if at all, Malawi’s Farm Input Subsidy Program (FISP) has impacted the gap. Regression results show the probability of adopting modern maize was 12% lower for wives in male-headed households, and 11% lower for female household heads, than for male farmers. Receipt of subsidized input coupons had no discernible effect on modern maize adoption for male farmers. Receiving a subsidy for both seed and fertilizer increased the probability of modern maize cultivation by 222% for female household heads, suggesting the FISP has likely reduced the gender gap in adoption of modern maize in Malawi.

Suggested Citation

  • Fisher, Monica & Kandiwa, Vongai, 2014. "Can agricultural input subsidies reduce the gender gap in modern maize adoption? Evidence from Malawi," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 45(C), pages 101-111.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jfpoli:v:45:y:2014:i:c:p:101-111
    DOI: 10.1016/j.foodpol.2014.01.007
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