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How does gender affect the adoption of agricultural innovations?: The case of improved maize technology in Ghana

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  • Doss, Cheryl R.
  • Morris, Michael L.

Abstract

Why do men and women adopt agricultural technologies at different rates? Evidence from Ghana suggests that gender-linked differences in the adoption of modern maize varieties and chemical fertilizer result from gender-linked differences in access to complementary inputs. This finding has important policy implications, because it suggests that ensuring more widespread and equitable adoption of improved technologies may not require changes in the research system, but rather introduction of measures that ensure better access for women to complementary inputs, especially land, labor, and extension services. © 2001 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.
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Suggested Citation

  • Doss, Cheryl R. & Morris, Michael L., 2001. "How does gender affect the adoption of agricultural innovations?: The case of improved maize technology in Ghana," Agricultural Economics, Blackwell, vol. 25(1), pages 27-39, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:agecon:v:25:y:2001:i:1:p:27-39
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Kumar, Shubh K., 1994. "Adoption of hybrid maize in Zambia: effects on gender roles, food consumption, and nutrition," Research reports 100, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    2. Doss, Cheryl R., 1999. "Twenty-Five Years Of Research On Women Farmers In Africa: Lessons And Implications For Agricultural Research Institutions; With An Annotated Bibliography," Economics Program Papers 23720, CIMMYT: International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center.
    3. Udry, Christopher, 1996. "Gender, Agricultural Production, and the Theory of the Household," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 104(5), pages 1010-1046, October.
    4. Rogers, Beatrice Lorge, 1995. "Alternative definitions of female headship in the Dominican Republic," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 23(12), pages 2033-2039, December.
    5. Feder, Gershon & Just, Richard E & Zilberman, David, 1985. "Adoption of Agricultural Innovations in Developing Countries: A Survey," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 33(2), pages 255-298, January.
    6. Morris, Michael L. & Tripp, Robert & Dankyi, A.A., 1999. "Adoption and Impacts of Improved Maize Production Technology: A Case Study of the Ghana Grains Development Project," Economics Program Papers 48767, CIMMYT: International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center.
    7. Doss, Cheryl R., 2002. "Men's Crops? Women's Crops? The Gender Patterns of Cropping in Ghana," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 30(11), pages 1987-2000, November.
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    JEL classification:

    • Q12 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - Micro Analysis of Farm Firms, Farm Households, and Farm Input Markets

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