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Adoption and Impacts of Improved Maize Production Technology: A Case Study of the Ghana Grains Development Project

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  • Morris, Michael L.
  • Tripp, Robert
  • Dankyi, A.A.

Abstract

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Suggested Citation

  • Morris, Michael L. & Tripp, Robert & Dankyi, A.A., 1999. "Adoption and Impacts of Improved Maize Production Technology: A Case Study of the Ghana Grains Development Project," Economics Program Papers 48767, CIMMYT: International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:cimmep:48767
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    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/48767
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Doss, Cheryl R. & Morris, Michael L., 2001. "How does gender affect the adoption of agricultural innovations? The case of improved maize technology in Ghana," Agricultural Economics of Agricultural Economists, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 25(1), June.
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    Cited by:

    1. Ouma, James Okuro & Bett, Charles & Githaigah, T., 2010. "Markets Access, Approaches and Opportunities for Quality Protein Maize Products," 2010 AAAE Third Conference/AEASA 48th Conference, September 19-23, 2010, Cape Town, South Africa 96173, African Association of Agricultural Economists (AAAE);Agricultural Economics Association of South Africa (AEASA).
    2. Smale, Melinda & Jayne, T.S., 2003. "Maize in Eastern and Southern Africa: 'seeds' of success in retrospect," EPTD discussion papers 97, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    3. Doss, Cheryl R. & Morris, Michael L., 2001. "How does gender affect the adoption of agricultural innovations? The case of improved maize technology in Ghana," Agricultural Economics of Agricultural Economists, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 25(1), June.
    4. Langyintuo, Augustine S. & Mungoma, Catherine, 2008. "The effect of household wealth on the adoption of improved maize varieties in Zambia," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 33(6), pages 550-559, December.
    5. Genti Kostandini & Bradford F. Mills & Steven Were Omamo & Stanley Wood, 2009. ""Ex ante" analysis of the benefits of transgenic drought tolerance research on cereal crops in low-income countries," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 40(4), pages 477-492, July.
    6. Arega D. Alene & Abebe Menkir & S. O. Ajala & B. Badu-Apraku & A. S. Olanrewaju & V. M. Manyong & Abdou Ndiaye, 2009. "The economic and poverty impacts of maize research in West and Central Africa," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 40(5), pages 535-550, September.
    7. Kiiza, Barnabas & Pederson, Glenn, 2012. "ICT-based market information and adoption of agricultural seed technologies: Insights from Uganda," Telecommunications Policy, Elsevier, vol. 36(4), pages 253-259.
    8. Nkechi S. Owoo & Monica P. Lambon-Quayefio, 2017. "The agro-processing industry and its potential for structural transformation of the Ghanaian economy," WIDER Working Paper Series 009, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    9. Mahoukede, Kinkingninhoun-Medagbe & Aliou, Diagne & Rita A., Agboh-Noameshie, 2015. "Impact of NERICA Adoption on Productivity and Income in Benin: Is There Gender Difference?," 2015 Conference, August 9-14, 2015, Milan, Italy 211634, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    10. Becerril, Javier & Abdulai, Awudu, 2010. "The Impact of Improved Maize Varieties on Poverty in Mexico: A Propensity Score-Matching Approach," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 38(7), pages 1024-1035, July.
    11. Mintewab Bezabih & Remidius Ruhinduka & Mare Sarr, 2016. "Climate change perception and system of rice intensification (SRI) impact on dispersion and downside risk: a moment approximation approach," GRI Working Papers 256, Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment.
    12. Acheampong, Patricia & Owusu, Victor, 2015. "Impact of Improved cassava varieties' adoption on farmers' incomes in Rural Ghana," 2015 Conference, August 9-14, 2015, Milan, Italy 210875, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    13. Cook, Aaron M. & Ricker-Gilbert, Jacob E. & Sesmero, Juan P., 2013. "How do African households adapt to climate change? Evidence from Malawi," 2013 Annual Meeting, August 4-6, 2013, Washington, D.C. 150507, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.

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