IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

Ex-Ante Adoption of New Cooking Banana (Matooke) Hybrids in Uganda Based on Farmers' Perceptions

  • Kenneth, Akankwasa
  • Gerald, Ortmann
  • Edilegnaw, Wale
  • Wilberforce, Tushemereirwe
Registered author(s):

    ABSTRACT Despite the research efforts to introduce the newly developed, improved banana ’Matooke’ hybrids to the farming communities in Uganda, to date no attempt has been made to document the likelihood of farmer adoption of these hybrid bananas in Uganda. The paper has analyzed farmers’ perceptions regarding the newly developed improved Matooke hybrid banana attributes in Uganda to ex ante understand farmers’ likelihood of adoption of these varieties. Descriptive statistics and data reduction techniques (like factor analysis) were used to define the potential explanatory variables affecting adoption. Following this, a Zero Inflated Poisson (ZIP) regression model was applied to estimate the effect of farmers’ perceptions about the hybrid banana attributes and other factors on the likelihood of adoption of the Matooke hybrid banana variety. The results show that, compared to Mbwazirume – a local variety used as a reference, four of the hybrid banana varieties considered are perceived to be better in terms of production characteristics (resistance to sigatoka, weevils, nematodes, tolerance to poor soils, good bunch size, sucker production) but are regarded as inferior in terms of consumption characteristics (taste, colour when cooked, flavour). The hybrid M9 is regarded as having a relatively good performance with respect to most of the production and consumption characteristics. The results of the ZIP regression analysis, including farmer characteristics like gender, family size, age and farmer perceptions of varietal attributes, disease and pests, yield and agronomic attributes, were positively associated with the likely adoption of most of the hybrid bananas. In collaboration with extension agents, variety M9 could be disseminated to a wider farming community targeting, larger households, younger farmers and relatively farmers with large size of land.

    If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/123302
    Download Restriction: no

    Paper provided by International Association of Agricultural Economists in its series 2012 Conference, August 18-24, 2012, Foz do Iguacu, Brazil with number 123302.

    as
    in new window

    Length:
    Date of creation: 18 Aug 2012
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:ags:iaae12:123302
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.iaae-agecon.org/
    Email:


    More information through EDIRC

    References listed on IDEAS
    Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

    as in new window
    1. Adesina, Akinwumi A. & Zinnah, Moses M., 1993. "Technology characteristics, farmers' perceptions and adoption decisions: A Tobit model application in Sierra Leone," Agricultural Economics, Blackwell, vol. 9(4), pages 297-311, December.
    2. Krishna, Vijesh V. & Qaim, Matin, 2007. "Estimating the adoption of Bt eggplant in India: Who Benefits from public-private partnership?," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 32(5-6), pages 523-543.
    3. Timothy C. Haab & Kenneth E. McConnell, 1996. "Count Data Models and the Problem of Zeros in Recreation Demand Analysis," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 78(1), pages 89-102.
    4. Doss, Cheryl R., 2003. "Understanding Farm-Level Technology Adoption: Lessons Learned From Cimmyt'S Micro Surveys In Eastern Africa," Economics Working Papers 46552, CIMMYT: International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center.
    5. Zeller, Manfred & Diagne, Aliou & Mataya, Charles, 1998. "Market access by smallholder farmers in Malawi: implications for technology adoption, agricultural productivity and crop income," Agricultural Economics, Blackwell, vol. 19(1-2), pages 219-229, September.
    6. Zavale, Helder & Mabaya, Edward T. & Christy, Ralph D., 2005. "Adoption of Improved Maize Seed by Smallholder Farmers in Mozambique," Staff Papers 121065, Cornell University, Department of Applied Economics and Management.
    7. Benin, S. & Smale, M. & Pender, J. & Gebremedhin, B. & Ehui, S., 2004. "The economic determinants of cereal crop diversity on farms in the Ethiopian highlands," Agricultural Economics, Blackwell, vol. 31(2-3), pages 197-208, December.
    8. Feder, Gershon & Just, Richard E & Zilberman, David, 1985. "Adoption of Agricultural Innovations in Developing Countries: A Survey," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 33(2), pages 255-98, January.
    9. Barrera, Victor & Norton, George W. & Alwang, Jeffrey Roger & Mauceri, Maria, 2005. "Adoption of Integrated Pest Management Technologies: A Case Study of Potato Farmers in Carchi, Ecuador," 2005 Annual meeting, July 24-27, Providence, RI 19400, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
    10. Sall, S. & Norman, D. & Featherstone, A. M., 2000. "Quantitative assessment of improved rice variety adoption: the farmer's perspective," Agricultural Systems, Elsevier, vol. 66(2), pages 129-144, November.
    11. Hintze, L. H. & Renkow, M. & Sain, G., 2003. "Variety characteristics and maize adoption in Honduras," Agricultural Economics, Blackwell, vol. 29(3), pages 307-317, December.
    12. Doss, Cheryl R. & Morris, Michael L., 2001. "How does gender affect the adoption of agricultural innovations? The case of improved maize technology in Ghana," Agricultural Economics of Agricultural Economists, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 25(1), June.
    13. Romina Cavatassi & Leslie Lipper & Ulf Narloch, 2011. "Modern variety adoption and risk management in drought prone areas: insights from the sorghum farmers of eastern Ethiopia," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 42(3), pages 279-292, 05.
    14. Ephraim Nkonya & Ted Schroeder & David Norman, 1997. "Factors Affecting Adoption Of Improved Maize Seed And Fertiliser In Northern Tanzania," Journal of Agricultural Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 48(1-3), pages 1-12.
    15. Hintze, L. H. & Renkow, M. & Sain, G., 2003. "Variety characteristics and maize adoption in Honduras," Agricultural Economics of Agricultural Economists, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 29(3), December.
    16. Alene, Arega D. & Poonyth, Daneswar & Hassan, Rashid M., 2000. "Determinants of adoption and intensity of use of improved maize varieties in the Central Highlands of Ethiopia: A Tobit analysis," Agrekon, Agricultural Economics Association of South Africa (AEASA), vol. 39(4), December.
    17. Langyintuo, Augustine S. & Mungoma, Catherine, 2008. "The effect of household wealth on the adoption of improved maize varieties in Zambia," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 33(6), pages 550-559, December.
    18. Zeller, Manfred & Diagne, Aliou & Mataya, Charles, 1998. "Market access by smallholder farmers in Malawi: implications for technology adoption, agricultural productivity and crop income," Agricultural Economics of Agricultural Economists, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 19(1-2), September.
    19. Feleke, Shiferaw & Zegeye, Tesfaye, 2006. "Adoption of improved maize varieties in Southern Ethiopia: Factors and strategy options," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 31(5), pages 442-457, October.
    20. Svetlana Edmeades & Melinda Smale, 2006. "A trait-based model of the potential demand for a genetically engineered food crop in a developing economy," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 35(3), pages 351-361, November.
    21. Adesina, Akinwumi A. & Zinnah, Moses M., 1993. "Technology characteristics, farmers' perceptions and adoption decisions: A Tobit model application in Sierra Leone," Agricultural Economics of Agricultural Economists, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 9(4), December.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

    When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ags:iaae12:123302. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (AgEcon Search)

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

    If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.