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Determinants of Improved Maize Seed and Fertilizer Use in Kenya: Policy Implications

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  • Ouma, James Okuro
  • De Groote, Hugo
  • Owuor, George

Abstract

Maize is a key food crop in Kenya. While maize yields increased from 1.25 t ha-1 in early 1960s to over 2 tonnes in 1982, they fell below 1.5 t ha-1 in 2000. Given the limited land area, there is no doubt that Kenya will have to rely more on modern technologies for increased yields .Use of improved maize varieties and fertilizers will therefore continue to be critical inputs for improving productivity. To improve production, it is important to understand factors determining adoption and intensity of use of modern technologies. A stratified 2-stage sampling design was used to select 1800 households, subsequently interviewed by means of structured questionnaire. Econometric models were used to explore factors influencing adoption and intensity of use of the improved varieties and fertilizer. Access to credit was positively related to adoption and intensity of use of the two inputs. Extension contacts positively influenced the likelihood of adoption of improved maize seed, while amount of planting fertilizer used positively influenced both the adoption and intensity of use of improved varieties. Distance to market negatively determined the adoption and intensity of use of fertilizer. In addition gender and access to hired labour had negative impacts on the intensity of use of fertilizer. There is need to think of alternative sources of credit to farmers and also revamp the existing extension service (including privatization in the long term) for efficient delivery of information.

Suggested Citation

  • Ouma, James Okuro & De Groote, Hugo & Owuor, George, 2006. "Determinants of Improved Maize Seed and Fertilizer Use in Kenya: Policy Implications," 2006 Annual Meeting, August 12-18, 2006, Queensland, Australia 25433, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:iaae06:25433
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    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/25433
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Kumar, Shubh K., 1994. "Adoption of hybrid maize in Zambia: effects on gender roles, food consumption, and nutrition," Research reports 100, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    2. Ephraim Nkonya & Ted Schroeder & David Norman, 1997. "Factors Affecting Adoption Of Improved Maize Seed And Fertiliser In Northern Tanzania," Journal of Agricultural Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 48(1-3), pages 1-12.
    3. Adesina, Akinwumi A. & Zinnah, Moses M., 1993. "Technology characteristics, farmers' perceptions and adoption decisions: A Tobit model application in Sierra Leone," Agricultural Economics of Agricultural Economists, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 9(4), December.
    4. Doss, Cheryl R., 2003. "Understanding Farm-Level Technology Adoption: Lessons Learned From Cimmyt'S Micro Surveys In Eastern Africa," Economics Working Papers 46552, CIMMYT: International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center.
    5. Langyintuo, Augustine S. & Mekuria, Mulugetta, 2005. "Accounting for Neighborhood Influence in Estimating Factors Determining the Adoption of Improved Agricultural Technologies," 2005 Annual meeting, July 24-27, Providence, RI 19521, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
    6. Feder, Gershon & Just, Richard E & Zilberman, David, 1985. "Adoption of Agricultural Innovations in Developing Countries: A Survey," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 33(2), pages 255-298, January.
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    Cited by:

    1. Andre Croppenstedt & Markus Goldstein & Nina Rosas, 2013. "Gender and Agriculture: Inefficiencies, Segregation, and Low Productivity Traps," World Bank Research Observer, World Bank Group, vol. 28(1), pages 79-109, February.
    2. Mwangi wa Githinji & Charalampos Konstantinidis & Andrew Barenberg, 2011. "Small and as Productive : Female Headed Households and the Inverse Relationship between Land Size and Output in Kenya," UMASS Amherst Economics Working Papers 2011-31, University of Massachusetts Amherst, Department of Economics.

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