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Institutional constraints and adoption of improved rice varieties: Econometric evidence from Ivory Coast

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  • Tite Ehuitché Beke

    (Unité de formation et de recherche en sciences économiques et de gestion (UFR-SEG), Université de Cocody, BP V 43, Abidjan)

Abstract

The main objective of this article is to analyze the impact of institutional constraints on the adoption and use intensity of improved rice varieties at the farm level. Among institutional barriers to the adoption of improved technologies by farming households, this paper focuses on credit constraints and deficiencies of transportation infrastructures. In our methodological process, a formal theoretical framework is examined before specifying the econometric model. The theoretical findings show a positive relationship between the amount of credit available and the adoption level of improved rice varieties. They also indicate a negative impact of transportation costs on the intensity of use of these new varieties. Econometric evidence was implemented from 311 Ivorian rice farmers using a fractional logit model. The econometric estimates confirm the findings that improving access to credit and reducing transportation costs encourage the adoption of modern rice varieties.

Suggested Citation

  • Tite Ehuitché Beke, 2011. "Institutional constraints and adoption of improved rice varieties: Econometric evidence from Ivory Coast," Review of Agricultural and Environmental Studies - Revue d'Etudes en Agriculture et Environnement, INRA Department of Economics, vol. 92(2), pages 117-141.
  • Handle: RePEc:rae:jourae:v:92:y:2011:i:2:p:117-141
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    3. Feder, Gershon & Just, Richard E & Zilberman, David, 1985. "Adoption of Agricultural Innovations in Developing Countries: A Survey," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 33(2), pages 255-298, January.
    4. Adesina, Akinwumi A. & Zinnah, Moses M., 1993. "Technology characteristics, farmers' perceptions and adoption decisions: A Tobit model application in Sierra Leone," Agricultural Economics, Blackwell, vol. 9(4), pages 297-311, December.
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    Cited by:

    1. Jaleta, Moti & Yirga, Chilot & Kassie, Menale & De Groote, Hugo & Shiferaw, Bekele, 2013. "Knowledge, Adoption and Use Intensity of Improved Maize Technologies in Ethiopia," 2013 AAAE Fourth International Conference, September 22-25, 2013, Hammamet, Tunisia 161483, African Association of Agricultural Economists (AAAE).
    2. Pacillo, Grazia, 2016. "Market participation, innovation adoption and poverty in rural Ghana," Economics PhD Theses 0916, Department of Economics, University of Sussex.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    adoption; agricultural innovations; food security; fractional logit;

    JEL classification:

    • Q12 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - Micro Analysis of Farm Firms, Farm Households, and Farm Input Markets
    • Q16 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - R&D; Agricultural Technology; Biofuels; Agricultural Extension Services
    • C24 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Truncated and Censored Models; Switching Regression Models; Threshold Regression Models

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