IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/ags/aaae13/161483.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Knowledge, Adoption and Use Intensity of Improved Maize Technologies in Ethiopia

Author

Listed:
  • Jaleta, Moti
  • Yirga, Chilot
  • Kassie, Menale
  • De Groote, Hugo
  • Shiferaw, Bekele

Abstract

Since the beginning of 1970’s, more than 40 improved maize varieties have been released and disseminated to maize potential areas in Ethiopia. Using cross-sectional survey data collected in 2011 from 39 districts in five Regional States, this paper examines smallholder farmers’ knowledge, adoption and intensity of use of improved maize varieties in the country. Poisson, binary and multinomial Probit, Tobit and Heckman’s selection models are used in explaining determinants of maize variety knowledge, adoption, intensity of maize area under improved varieties at a household level, and type of maize seed used at plot level. Results show that household characteristics, availability of family labor, wealth status, social networks, and access to credit to buy seed and fertilizer, better soil fertility and depth, market opportunities (number of traders known in villages) affect the number of improved maize varieties known to farmers, their adoption and intensity of farm area allocated to improved varieties, and the use of freshly purchased hybrid and/or OPV maize varieties. Generally, institutional arrangements that strengthen farmers’ access to input and output markets and accumulation of wealth could enhance the knowledge and use of improved maize technologies for better productivity and household income.

Suggested Citation

  • Jaleta, Moti & Yirga, Chilot & Kassie, Menale & De Groote, Hugo & Shiferaw, Bekele, 2013. "Knowledge, Adoption and Use Intensity of Improved Maize Technologies in Ethiopia," 2013 Fourth International Conference, September 22-25, 2013, Hammamet, Tunisia 161483, African Association of Agricultural Economists (AAAE).
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:aaae13:161483
    DOI: 10.22004/ag.econ.161483
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://ageconsearch.umn.edu/record/161483/files/Moti%20Jaleta_%20Chilot%20Yirga%20et%20al.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. de Janvry, Alain & Fafchamps, Marcel & Sadoulet, Elisabeth, 1991. "Peasant Household Behaviour with Missing Markets: Some Paradoxes Explained," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 101(409), pages 1400-1417, November.
    2. Smale, Melinda & Byerlee, Derek & Jayne, Thom, 2011. "Maize revolutions in Sub-Saharan Africa," Policy Research Working Paper Series 5659, The World Bank.
    3. Tavneet Suri, 2006. "Selection and Comparative Advantage in Technology Adoption," Working Papers 944, Economic Growth Center, Yale University.
    4. Andre Croppenstedt & Mulat Demeke & Meloria M. Meschi, 2003. "Technology Adoption in the Presence of Constraints: the Case of Fertilizer Demand in Ethiopia," Review of Development Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 7(1), pages 58-70, February.
    5. Feder, Gershon & Just, Richard E & Zilberman, David, 1985. "Adoption of Agricultural Innovations in Developing Countries: A Survey," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 33(2), pages 255-298, January.
    6. Bekele A. Shiferaw & Tewodros A. Kebede & Liang You, 2008. "Technology adoption under seed access constraints and the economic impacts of improved pigeonpea varieties in Tanzania," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 39(3), pages 309-323, November.
    7. Arega D. Alene & Abebe Menkir & S. O. Ajala & B. Badu‐Apraku & A. S. Olanrewaju & V. M. Manyong & Abdou Ndiaye, 2009. "The economic and poverty impacts of maize research in West and Central Africa," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 40(5), pages 535-550, September.
    8. Besley, Timothy & Case, Anne, 1993. "Modeling Technology Adoption in Developing Countries," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 83(2), pages 396-402, May.
    9. Tite Ehuitché Beke, 2011. "Institutional constraints and adoption of improved rice varieties: Econometric evidence from Ivory Coast," Review of Agricultural and Environmental Studies - Revue d'Etudes en Agriculture et Environnement, INRA Department of Economics, vol. 92(2), pages 117-141.
    10. Feleke, Shiferaw & Zegeye, Tesfaye, 2006. "Adoption of improved maize varieties in Southern Ethiopia: Factors and strategy options," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 31(5), pages 442-457, October.
    11. Byerlee, Derek & Heisey, Paul W., 1996. "Past and potential impacts of maize research in sub-Saharan Africa: a critical assessment," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 21(3), pages 255-277, July.
    12. Maredia, Mywish K. & Byerlee, Derek & Pee, Peter, 2000. "Impacts of food crop improvement research: evidence from sub-Saharan Africa," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 25(5), pages 531-559, October.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Srivastava, Amit Kumar & Mboh, Cho Miltin & Gaiser, Thomas & Kuhn, Arnim & Ermias, Engida & Ewert, Frank, 2019. "Effect of mineral fertilizer on rain water and radiation use efficiencies for maize yield and stover biomass productivity in Ethiopia," Agricultural Systems, Elsevier, vol. 168(C), pages 88-100.
    2. Kanyamuka, Joseph S., 2017. "Adoption Of Integrated Soil Fertility Management Technologies And Its Effect On Maize Productivity: A Case Of The Legume Best Bets Project In Mkanakhoti Extension Planning Area Of Kasungu District In ," Research Theses 276444, Collaborative Masters Program in Agricultural and Applied Economics.
    3. Kanyamuka, Joseph S., 2017. "Adoption Of Integrated Soil Fertility Management Technologies And Its Effect On Maize Productivity: A Case Of The Legume Best Bets Project In Mkanakhoti Extension Planning Area Of Kasungu District In ," Research Theses 265581, Collaborative Masters Program in Agricultural and Applied Economics.

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ags:aaae13:161483. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (AgEcon Search). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/aaaeaea.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.