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Past and potential impacts of maize research in sub-Saharan Africa: a critical assessment

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  • Byerlee, Derek
  • Heisey, Paul W.

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  • Byerlee, Derek & Heisey, Paul W., 1996. "Past and potential impacts of maize research in sub-Saharan Africa: a critical assessment," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 21(3), pages 255-277, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jfpoli:v:21:y:1996:i:3:p:255-277
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Jonathan Kydd, 1989. "Maize research in Malawi: Lessons from failure," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 1(1), pages 112-144, January.
    2. Howard, Julie A. & Chitala, George M. & Kalonge, Sylvester M., 1993. "The Impact of Investments in Maize Research and Dissemination in Zambia Part I: Main Report," Food Security International Development Working Papers 54732, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    3. Boughton, Duncan & Frahan, Bruno Henry de, 1994. "Agricultural Research Impact Assessment: The Case of Maize Technology Adoption in Southern Mali," Food Security International Development Working Papers 54729, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    4. Eicher, Carl K., 1995. "Zimbabwe's maize-based Green Revolution: Preconditions for replication," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 23(5), pages 805-818, May.
    5. Matlon, Peter J., 1990. "Improving Productivity in Sorghum and Pearl Millet in Semi-Arid Africa," Food Research Institute Studies, Stanford University, Food Research Institute, vol. 0(Number 1), pages 1-44.
    6. Jha, D. (Dayanatha) & Hojjati, Behjat, 1993. "Fertilizer use on smallholder farms in Eastern Province, Zambia:," Research reports 94, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    7. Sahn, David E. & Arulpragasam, Jehan, 1991. "The stagnation of smallholder agriculture in Malawi : A decade of structural adjustment," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 16(3), pages 219-234, June.
    8. Rauniyar, Ganesh P. & Goode, Frank M., 1992. "Technology adoption on small farms," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 20(2), pages 275-282, February.
    9. Melinda Smale & Paul W. Heisey, 1994. "Maize research in Malawi revisited: An emerging success story?," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 6(6), pages 689-706, November.
    10. Smith, Joyotee, et al, 1994. "The Role of Technology in Agricultural Intensification: The Evolution of Maize Production in the Northern Guinea Savanna of Nigeria," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 42(3), pages 537-554, April.
    11. Rohrbach, David D., 1989. "The Economics of Smallholder Maize Production in Zimbabwe: Implications for Food Security," Food Security International Development Papers 54060, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    12. Collinson, M.P., 1982. "Farming Systems Research in Eastern Africa: The Experience of CIMMYT and Some National Agricultural Research Services, 1976-81," Food Security International Development Papers 54068, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    13. Howard, Julie A. & Chitala, George M. & Kalonge, Sylvester M., 1993. "The Impact of Investments in Maize Research and Dissemination in Zambia, Part II: Annexes," Food Security International Development Working Papers 54731, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    14. Tripp, Robert, 1993. "Invisible hands, indigenous knowledge and inevitable fads: Challenges to public sector agricultural research in Ghana," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 21(12), pages 2003-2016, December.
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    Cited by:

    1. Bradford F. Mills, 1998. "Ex Ante Research Evaluation and Regional Trade Flows: Maize in Kenya," Journal of Agricultural Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 49(3), pages 393-408.
    2. World Bank, 2008. "Nigeria - Agriculture Public Expenditure Review," World Bank Other Operational Studies 7923, The World Bank.
    3. Chibwana, Christopher & Fisher, Monica & Shively, Gerald, 2012. "Cropland Allocation Effects of Agricultural Input Subsidies in Malawi," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 40(1), pages 124-133.
    4. Dalton, Timothy J., 2004. "A household hedonic model of rice traits: economic values from farmers in West Africa," Agricultural Economics, Blackwell, vol. 31(2-3), pages 149-159, December.
    5. Jaleta, Moti & Yirga, Chilot & Kassie, Menale & De Groote, Hugo & Shiferaw, Bekele, 2013. "Knowledge, Adoption and Use Intensity of Improved Maize Technologies in Ethiopia," 2013 Fourth International Conference, September 22-25, 2013, Hammamet, Tunisia 161483, African Association of Agricultural Economists (AAAE).
    6. Kremer, Michael & Zwane, Alix Peterson, 2005. "Encouraging Private Sector Research for Tropical Agriculture," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 33(1), pages 87-105, January.
    7. Mywish K. Maredia & David Anthony Raitzer, 2010. "Estimating overall returns to international agricultural research in Africa through benefit-cost analysis: a "best-evidence" approach," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 41(1), pages 81-100, January.
    8. Maredia, Mywish K. & Byerlee, Derek & Pee, Peter, 2000. "Impacts of food crop improvement research: evidence from sub-Saharan Africa," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 25(5), pages 531-559, October.
    9. Gladwin, Christina H. & Thomson, Anne M. & Peterson, Jennifer S. & Anderson, Andrea S., 2001. "Addressing food security in Africa via multiple livelihood strategies of women farmers," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 26(2), pages 177-207, April.
    10. Jayne, T. S. & Jones, Stephen, 1997. "Food marketing and pricing policy in Eastern and Southern Africa: A survey," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 25(9), pages 1505-1527, September.
    11. Holden, Stein, 2013. "Amazing maize in Malawi: Input subsidies, factor productivity and land use intensification," CLTS Working Papers 4/13, Norwegian University of Life Sciences, Centre for Land Tenure Studies.
    12. Jonas Kathage & Menale Kassie & Bekele Shiferaw & Matin Qaim, 2016. "Big Constraints or Small Returns? Explaining Nonadoption of Hybrid Maize in Tanzania," Applied Economic Perspectives and Policy, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 38(1), pages 113-131.
    13. Rukuni, Mandivamba & Blackie, Malcolm J. & Eicher, Carl K., 1998. "Crafting smallholder-driven agricultural research systems in Southern Africa," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 26(6), pages 1073-1087, June.
    14. Chibwana, Christopher & Shively, Gerald & Fisher, Monica & Jumbe, Charles & Masters, William A., 2014. "Measuring the impacts of Malawi’s farm input subsidy programme," African Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, African Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 0(Number 2), pages 1-16, April.
    15. Phillip, Dayo & Nkonya, Ephraim & Pender, John L. & Oni, Omobowale Ayoola, 2009. "Constraints to increasing agricultural productivity in Nigeria: A review," NSSP working papers 6, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    16. Arega D. Alene & Abebe Menkir & S. O. Ajala & B. Badu-Apraku & A. S. Olanrewaju & V. M. Manyong & Abdou Ndiaye, 2009. "The economic and poverty impacts of maize research in West and Central Africa," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 40(5), pages 535-550, September.
    17. repec:eee:jfpoli:v:73:y:2017:i:c:p:104-118 is not listed on IDEAS
    18. Takamasa Akiyama & John Baffes & Donald Larson & Panos Varangis, 2001. "Commodity Market Reforms : Lessons of Two Decades," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 13852.
    19. Madan M. Dey & Ferdinand J. Paraguas & Patrick Kambewa & Diemuth E. Pemsl, 2010. "The impact of integrated aquaculture-agriculture on small-scale farms in Southern Malawi," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 41(1), pages 67-79, January.

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