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Why do some Food Availability Policies Fail? A Simulation Approach to Understanding Food Production Systems in South-east Africa

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  • David C. Lane
  • Birgit Kopainsky
  • Andreas Gerber

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  • David C. Lane & Birgit Kopainsky & Andreas Gerber, 2017. "Why do some Food Availability Policies Fail? A Simulation Approach to Understanding Food Production Systems in South-east Africa," Systems Research and Behavioral Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 34(4), pages 386-400, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:srbeha:v:34:y:2017:i:4:p:386-400
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1002/sres.2462
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Zulu, Ballard & Nijhoff, Jan J. & Jayne, Thomas S. & Negassa, Asfaw, 2000. "Is the Glass Half-Empty or Half Full? An Analysis of Agricultural Production Trends in Zambia," Food Security Collaborative Working Papers 54458, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    2. Howard, Julie A. & Chitala, George M. & Kalonge, Sylvester M., 1993. "The Impact of Investments in Maize Research and Dissemination in Zambia Part I: Main Report," Food Security International Development Working Papers 54732, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    3. Nelson P. Repenning, 2002. "A Simulation-Based Approach to Understanding the Dynamics of Innovation Implementation," Organization Science, INFORMS, vol. 13(2), pages 109-127, April.
    4. David C. Lane & Birgit Kopainsky & Leonard A. Malczynski, 2017. "Farming Systems Research and Food Availability," Systems Research and Behavioral Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 34(4), pages 401-402, July.
    5. Howard, Julie A. & Chitala, George M. & Kalonge, Sylvester M., 1993. "The Impact of Investments in Maize Research and Dissemination in Zambia, Part II: Annexes," Food Security International Development Working Papers 54731, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    6. Tembo, Solomon & Sitko, Nicholas, 2013. "Technical Compendium: Descriptive Agricultural Statistics and Analysis for Zambia," Food Security Collaborative Working Papers 155988, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    7. Chilonda, Pius & Olubode-Awosola, Femi & Minde, Isaac J. & Njiwa, Daniel & Govereh, Jones, 2009. "Monitoring of Public Spending in Agriculture in Southern Africa," 2009 Conference, August 16-22, 2009, Beijing, China 51663, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    8. Klaus Abbink & Thomas Jayne & Lars Moller, 2011. "The Relevance of a Rules-based Maize Marketing Policy: An Experimental Case Study of Zambia," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 47(2), pages 207-230.
    9. Andreas Gerber, 2016. "Short-Term Success versus Long-Term Failure: A Simulation-Based Approach for Understanding the Potential of Zambia’s Fertilizer Subsidy Program in Enhancing Maize Availability," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 8(10), pages 1-17, October.
    10. Zhiying Xu & William J. Burke & Thomas S. Jayne & Jones Govereh, 2009. "Do input subsidy programs “crowd in” or “crowd out” commercial market development? Modeling fertilizer demand in a two‐channel marketing system," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 40(1), pages 79-94, January.
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