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The Changing Structure of the Maize Seed Industry in Zambia: Prospects for Orange Maize

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  • Melinda Smale
  • Eliab Simpungwe
  • Ekin Birol
  • Girma Tesfahun Kassie
  • Hugo de Groote
  • Raphael Mutale

Abstract

ABSTRACT Zambia's maize seed industry is currently one of the strongest and most competitive in Sub‐Saharan Africa. This paper describes the changing structure of the maize seed industry and seed supply chain in Zambia. The aim of the paper is to propose elements of a marketing strategy for seed production and delivery of recently released, provitamin A‐rich, orange maize varieties. Information sources include a thorough review of the literature, a statistical survey of farmers in the major maize‐producing areas of the country, and key informant interviews conducted with seed company representatives. We discuss the merits of two strategies: (1) liberalizing the provision of original orange maize planting material to all seed companies with the aim of maximizing the impact of this public health intervention, and (2) exclusive rights granted to companies with the goals of preserving differentiated products and ensuring standard seed quality to protect the brand. We find that, exclusive or not, risk‐sharing contracts with any company that takes up this product, as well as building and maintaining a unique brand for orange maize would be essential for the success of this product.

Suggested Citation

  • Melinda Smale & Eliab Simpungwe & Ekin Birol & Girma Tesfahun Kassie & Hugo de Groote & Raphael Mutale, 2015. "The Changing Structure of the Maize Seed Industry in Zambia: Prospects for Orange Maize," Agribusiness, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 31(1), pages 132-146, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:wly:agribz:v:31:y:2015:i:1:p:132-146
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1002/agr.21384
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Banful, Afua Branoah, 2011. "Old Problems in the New Solutions? Politically Motivated Allocation of Program Benefits and the "New" Fertilizer Subsidies," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 39(7), pages 1166-1176, July.
    2. Flaherty, Kathleen & Mwala, Mick S., 2010. "Zambia: Recent developments in agricultural research," ASTI country briefs 3148, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    3. Flaherty, Kathleen & Mwala, Mick S., 2010. "Zambia: Recent developments in agricultural research," ASTI country briefs 778452772, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    4. Howard, Julie A. & Chitala, George M. & Kalonge, Sylvester M., 1993. "The Impact of Investments in Maize Research and Dissemination in Zambia Part I: Main Report," Food Security International Development Working Papers 54732, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    5. Smale, Melinda & Birol, Ekin, 2013. "Smallholder Demand for Maize Hybrids and Selective Seed Subsidies in Zambia," 2013 Fourth International Conference, September 22-25, 2013, Hammamet, Tunisia 161474, African Association of Agricultural Economists (AAAE).
    6. Howard, Julie A. & Chitala, George M. & Kalonge, Sylvester M., 1993. "The Impact of Investments in Maize Research and Dissemination in Zambia, Part II: Annexes," Food Security International Development Working Papers 54731, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
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    Cited by:

    1. Manzoor H. Dar & Dilruba A. Bano & Showkat A. Waza & Najam W. Zaidi & Asma Majid & Asif B. Shikari & M. Ashraf Ahangar & Mosharaf Hossain & Arvind Kumar & Uma S. Singh, 2021. "Abiotic Stress Tolerance-Progress and Pathways of Sustainable Rice Production," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 13(4), pages 1-19, February.
    2. Smale, Melinda & Moursi, Mourad & Birol, Ekin & De Groote, Hugo, 2013. "Hybrid seed use and diversity of diets among women in smallholder maize: Growing households in Zambia," HarvestPlus working papers 12, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).

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