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Smallholder demand for maize hybrids and selective seed subsidies in Zambia

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  • Smale, Melinda
  • Birol, Ekin

Abstract

This analysis explores smallholder demand for hybrid maize seed by subsidy receipt. We test the hypothesis that the hybrid maize subsidy in Zambia is selectively biased due in part to its delivery mechanism and the self-selection of farmers who are able or choose to exercise their claim. Our analysis found that farmers with a lower poverty headcount are more likely to receive subsidized seed. In addition, a segment of farmers with a high predicted demand for hybrid seed are not reached by FISP—and they are poorer in terms of land and income than those who obtain the subsidy. These farmers represent a potentially important demand segment for HarvestPlus, which might consider addressing their needs through means other than a subsidy program.

Suggested Citation

  • Smale, Melinda & Birol, Ekin, 2013. "Smallholder demand for maize hybrids and selective seed subsidies in Zambia," HarvestPlus working papers 9, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  • Handle: RePEc:fpr:harvwp:9
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    Cited by:

    1. Melinda Smale & Eliab Simpungwe & Ekin Birol & Girma Tesfahun Kassie & Hugo de Groote & Raphael Mutale, 2015. "The Changing Structure of the Maize Seed Industry in Zambia: Prospects for Orange Maize," Agribusiness, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 31(1), pages 132-146, January.
    2. Smale, Melinda & Mason, Nicole M., 2013. "Hybrid Seed, Income, and Inequality among Smallholder Maize Farmers in Zambia," Food Security Collaborative Working Papers 146929, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Zambia; Southern Africa; Africa south of Sahara; Africa; Hybrid maize; smallholder; decisionmaking; subsidies; Seed supply;
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