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The New Generation of African Fertilizer Subsidies: Panacea or Pandora’s Box?

Author

Listed:
  • Kelly, Valerie A.
  • Crawford, Eric W.
  • Ricker-Gilbert, Jacob

Abstract

For several reasons, fertilizer subsidies are again popular policy tools. First, there is broad agreement that fertilizer is a critical yet still-underused input for improving productivity and food security in Africa. Second, politicians have felt greater urgency to increase domestic food production since the 2007/08 food price crisis. Third, subsidy programs are highly visible, popular with voters, and viewed as politically beneficial. Fourth, donor budget support has made it easier for governments to pay for subsidies.

Suggested Citation

  • Kelly, Valerie A. & Crawford, Eric W. & Ricker-Gilbert, Jacob, 2011. "The New Generation of African Fertilizer Subsidies: Panacea or Pandora’s Box?," Food Security International Development Policy Syntheses 107460, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:midips:107460
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    File URL: http://ageconsearch.umn.edu/record/107460/files/number_87.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Ariga, Joshua & Jayne, Thomas S., 2009. "Private sector responses to public investments and policy reforms: The case of fertilizer and maize market development in Kenya," IFPRI discussion papers 921, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    2. Zhiying Xu & William J. Burke & Thomas S. Jayne & Jones Govereh, 2009. "Do input subsidy programs "crowd in" or "crowd out" commercial market development? Modeling fertilizer demand in a two-channel marketing system," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 40(1), pages 79-94, January.
    3. Jacob Ricker-Gilbert & Thomas S. Jayne & Ephraim Chirwa, 2010. "Subsidies and Crowding Out: A Double-Hurdle Model of Fertilizer Demand in Malawi," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 93(1), pages 26-42.
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    Cited by:

    1. Pan, Lei & Christiaensen, Luc, 2012. "Who is Vouching for the Input Voucher? Decentralized Targeting and Elite Capture in Tanzania," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 40(8), pages 1619-1633.
    2. repec:eee:wdevel:v:106:y:2018:i:c:p:124-135 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Harou, Aurélie & Liu, Yanyan & Barrett, Christopher B. & You, Liangzhi, 2014. "Variable returns to fertilizer use and its relationship to poverty: Experimental and simulation evidence from Malawi:," IFPRI discussion papers 1373, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    4. Kamel, Louhichi & Laura, Riesgo & Sergio, Gomez y Paloma, 2016. "Modelling farm-household level impacts of fertilizer subsidy programs on food security: The case of Ethiopia," 2016 Annual Meeting, July 31-August 2, Boston, Massachusetts 235927, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    5. Dionne, Kim Yi & Horowitz, Jeremy, 2016. "The Political Effects of Agricultural Subsidies in Africa: Evidence from Malawi," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 87(C), pages 215-226.
    6. Murathi Kiratu, Nixon, 2014. "An Assessment of the Impact of Kilimo Plus Subsidy Program on Smallholder Farmers' Food Security and Income in Nakuru North District, Kenya," Research Theses 243470, Collaborative Masters Program in Agricultural and Applied Economics.
    7. Zinnbauer, Maximilian & Mockshell, Jonathan & Zeller, Manfred, 2018. "Effects if Fertilizer Subsidies in Zambia: A Literature Review," MPRA Paper 84125, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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