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Determinants of adoption and intensity of use of improved maize varieties in the Central Highlands of Ethiopia: A Tobit analysis

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  • Alene, Arega D.
  • Poonyth, Daneswar
  • Hassan, Rashid M.

Abstract

This study employed a Tobit model to examine factors that influence the adoption and intensity of utilisation of improved maize varieties in the West Shoa Zone in the central highlands of Ethiopia. The estimated results indicate that level of education, household labour, farm size, extension services, farm income, and timely availability of improved maize seeds significantly influence the adoption and intensity of use of improved maize. It also showed that the impact of off-farm income and age of the household head on adoption and intensity of use of improved maize seed was insignificant.

Suggested Citation

  • Alene, Arega D. & Poonyth, Daneswar & Hassan, Rashid M., 2000. "Determinants of adoption and intensity of use of improved maize varieties in the Central Highlands of Ethiopia: A Tobit analysis," Agrekon, Agricultural Economics Association of South Africa (AEASA), vol. 39(4), December.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:agreko:54223
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    1. Baidu-Forson, J., 1999. "Factors influencing adoption of land-enhancing technology in the Sahel: lessons from a case study in Niger," Agricultural Economics, Blackwell, vol. 20(3), pages 231-239, May.
    2. Ephraim Nkonya & Ted Schroeder & David Norman, 1997. "Factors Affecting Adoption Of Improved Maize Seed And Fertiliser In Northern Tanzania," Journal of Agricultural Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 48(1-3), pages 1-12.
    3. Baidu-Forson, Jojo, 1999. "Factors influencing adoption of land-enhancing technology in the Sahel: lessons from a case study in Niger," Agricultural Economics of Agricultural Economists, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 20(3), May.
    4. Alamgir Hossain, Shah M. & Crouch, Bruce R., 1992. "Patterns and determinants of adoption of farm practices: Some evidence from Bangladesh," Agricultural Systems, Elsevier, vol. 38(1), pages 1-15.
    5. Amemiya, Takeshi, 1984. "Tobit models: A survey," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 24(1-2), pages 3-61.
    6. McDonald, John F & Moffitt, Robert A, 1980. "The Uses of Tobit Analysis," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 62(2), pages 318-321, May.
    7. Feder, Gershon & Just, Richard E & Zilberman, David, 1985. "Adoption of Agricultural Innovations in Developing Countries: A Survey," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 33(2), pages 255-298, January.
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    Cited by:

    1. Nakhumwa, TO & Hassan, RM, 2003. "The Adoption Of Soil Conservation Technologies By Smallholder Farmers In Malawi: A Selective Tobit Analysis," Agrekon, Agricultural Economics Association of South Africa (AEASA), vol. 42(3), September.
    2. Fufa, B. & Hassan, Rashid M., 2006. "Determinants of fertilizer use on maize in Eastern Ethiopia: A weighted endogenous sampling analysis of the extent and intensity of adoption," Agrekon, Agricultural Economics Association of South Africa (AEASA), vol. 45(1), March.
    3. Akinola, Adebayo A. & Alene, Arega D. & Adeyemo, Remi & Sanogo, D. & Olanrewaju, A.S. & Nwoke, C. & Nziguheba, G., 0. "Determinants of adoption and intensity of use of balance nutrient management systems technologies in the northern Guinea savanna of Nigeria," Quarterly Journal of International Agriculture, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, vol. 49.
    4. Kenneth, Akankwasa & Gerald, Ortmann & Edilegnaw, Wale & Wilberforce, Tushemereirwe, 2012. "Ex-Ante Adoption of New Cooking Banana (Matooke) Hybrids in Uganda Based on Farmers' Perceptions," 2012 Conference, August 18-24, 2012, Foz do Iguacu, Brazil 123302, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    5. Kaguongo, Wachira & Ortmann, Gerald F. & Wale, Edilegnaw & Darroch, Mark A.G. & Low, Jan W., 2010. "Factors influencing adoption and intensity of adoption of orange flesh sweetpotato varieties: evidence from an extension intervention in Nyanza and Western province, Kenya," 2010 AAAE Third Conference/AEASA 48th Conference, September 19-23, 2010, Cape Town, South Africa 96805, African Association of Agricultural Economists (AAAE);Agricultural Economics Association of South Africa (AEASA).
    6. Bola Amoke Awotide & Aziz A. Karimov & Aliou Diagne, 2016. "Agricultural technology adoption, commercialization and smallholder rice farmers’ welfare in rural Nigeria," Agricultural and Food Economics, Springer;Italian Society of Agricultural Economics (SIDEA), vol. 4(1), pages 1-24, December.
    7. Nkegbe, Paul Kwame & Shankar, Bhavani, 2014. "Adoption intensity of soil and water conservation practices by smallholders: evidence from Northern Ghana," Bio-based and Applied Economics Journal, Italian Association of Agricultural and Applied Economics (AIEAA), issue 2, August.
    8. Awotide, Bola Amoke & Diagne, Aliou & Awoyemi, Taiwo Timothy, 2013. "Agricultural Technology Adoption, Market Participation and Rural Farming Households’ Welfare in Nigeria," 2013 AAAE Fourth International Conference, September 22-25, 2013, Hammamet, Tunisia 160428, African Association of Agricultural Economists (AAAE).
    9. repec:spr:ssefpa:v:10:y:2018:i:1:d:10.1007_s12571-017-0749-0 is not listed on IDEAS
    10. Yigezu, Yigezu A. & Tizale, Chilot Y. & Aw-Hassan, Aden, 2015. "Modeling Farmers’ Adoption Decisions of Multiple Crop Technologies: The Case of Barley and Potatoes in Ethiopia," 2015 Conference, August 9-14, 2015, Milan, Italy 211867, International Association of Agricultural Economists.

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