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Factors Affecting the Adoption of Soil Conservation Measures: A Case Study of Fijian Cane Farmers

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  • Asafu-Adjaye, John

Abstract

This study explored the extent to which various factors affect Fijian cane farmers’ adoption of soil conservation measures. The significant factors affecting perception of the soil erosion problem include age, education, ethnicity, and extension services. On the other hand, the significant factors affecting soil conservation effort include perception of the erosion problem, net farm income, farm size, land type, and extension services. In general, personal characteristics appear to affect perceptions of soil erosion while the extent of conservation effort is affected by economic and physical factors. The resulting implications for soil conservation policy are discussed.

Suggested Citation

  • Asafu-Adjaye, John, 2008. "Factors Affecting the Adoption of Soil Conservation Measures: A Case Study of Fijian Cane Farmers," Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Western Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 33(01), April.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:jlaare:36710
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Gedikoglu, Haluk & McCann, Laura M.J. & Artz, Georgeanne M., 2011. "Off-Farm Employment Effects on Adoption of Nutrient Management Practices," Agricultural and Resource Economics Review, Northeastern Agricultural and Resource Economics Association, vol. 40(2), August.
    2. Gedikoglu, Haluk, 1. "Socio-Economic Factors And Adoption O Fenergy Crops," International Journal of Food and Agricultural Economics (IJFAEC), Alanya Alaaddin Keykubat University, Department of Economics and Finance, vol. 3(1).
    3. Jara-Rojas, Roberto & Bravo-Ureta, Boris E. & Díaz, José, 2012. "Adoption of water conservation practices: A socioeconomic analysis of small-scale farmers in Central Chile," Agricultural Systems, Elsevier, vol. 110(C), pages 54-62.
    4. Mulwa, Chalmers & Marenya, Paswel & Rahut, Dil Bahadur & Kassie, Menale, 2015. "Response to Climate Risks among Smallholder Farmers in Malawi: A Multivariate Probit Assessment of the Role of Information, Household Demographics and Farm Characteristics," 2015 Conference, August 9-14, 2015, Milan, Italy 212511, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    5. Emmanuel Benjamin & Matthias Blum, 2015. "Participation of smallholders in carbon-certified small-scale agroforestry: A lesson from the rural Mount Kenyan region," Economics Working Papers 15-03, Queen's Management School, Queen's University Belfast.
    6. Jara-Rojas, Roberto & Bravo-Ureta, Boris E. & Moreira, Victor H. & Diaz, Jose, 2012. "Natural Resource Conservation and Technical Efficiency from Small-scale Farmers in Central Chile," 2012 Conference, August 18-24, 2012, Foz do Iguacu, Brazil 126227, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    7. Gedikoglu, Haluk, 2012. "Impact of Off-Farm Employment on Farmers’ Willingness to Grow Switchgrass and Miscanthus," 2012 Annual Meeting, February 4-7, 2012, Birmingham, Alabama 119663, Southern Agricultural Economics Association.

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