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Factors influencing adoption of conservation tillage in Australian cropping regions

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  • D'Emden, Francis H.
  • Llewellyn, Rick S.
  • Burton, Michael P.

Abstract

The purpose of this research is to improve understanding of conservation tillage adoption decisions by identifying key biophysical and socio-economic factors influencing no-till adoption by grain growers across four Australian cropping regions. The study is based on interviews with 384 grain growers using a questionnaire aimed at eliciting perceptions relating to a range of possible long- and short-term agronomic interactions associated with the relative economic advantage of shifting to a no-tillage cropping system. Together with other farm and farmer-specific variables, a dichotomous logistic regression analysis was used to identify opportunities for research and extension to facilitate more rapid adoption decisions. The broader systems approach to considering conservation tillage adoption identified important determinants of adoption not associated with soil conservation and erosion prevention benefits. Most growers recognised the erosion-reducing benefits of no-till but it was not an important factor in explaining whether a grower was an adopter or non-adopter. Perceptions associated with shorter-term crop production benefits under no-till, such as the relative effectiveness of pre-emergent herbicides and the ability to sow crops earlier on less rainfall were influential. Employment of a consultant and increased attendance of cropping extension activities were strongly associated with no-till adoption, confirming the information and learning-intensive nature of adopting no-till cropping systems.

Suggested Citation

  • D'Emden, Francis H. & Llewellyn, Rick S. & Burton, Michael P., 2008. "Factors influencing adoption of conservation tillage in Australian cropping regions," Australian Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society, vol. 52(2), June.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:aareaj:118537
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Micheels, Eric T. & Nolan, James F., 2016. "Examining the effects of absorptive capacity and social capital on the adoption of agricultural innovations: A Canadian Prairie case study," Agricultural Systems, Elsevier, vol. 145(C), pages 127-138.
    2. repec:eco:journ1:2017-05-38 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. repec:gam:jsusta:v:8:y:2016:i:4:p:304:d:66850 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Kolikow, Steven & Kragt, Marit Ellen & Mugera, Amin W., 2012. "An interdisciplinary framework of limits and barriers to climate change adaptation in agriculture," Working Papers 120467, University of Western Australia, School of Agricultural and Resource Economics.
    5. Wade, Tara & Claassen, Roger, 2015. "Modeling No-Tillage Adoption by Corn and Soybean Producers: Insights into Sustained Adoption," 2015 AAEA & WAEA Joint Annual Meeting, July 26-28, San Francisco, California 204957, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association;Western Agricultural Economics Association.
    6. Nossal, Katarina, 2012. "Innovative capacity and productivity: an empirical analysis of Australian grain growers," 2012 Conference (56th), February 7-10, 2012, Freemantle, Australia 124353, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society.
    7. Marita Laukkanen & NAUGES Céline, 2009. "Environmental and production cost impacts of no-till: estimates from observed behavior," LERNA Working Papers 09.28.304, LERNA, University of Toulouse.
    8. Mandleni, B. & Anim, F.D.K., 2011. "Climate Change Awareness And Decision On Adaptation Measures By Livestock Farmers," 85th Annual Conference, April 18-20, 2011, Warwick University, Coventry, UK 108794, Agricultural Economics Society.
    9. repec:gam:jsusta:v:10:y:2018:i:2:p:432-:d:130690 is not listed on IDEAS
    10. repec:gam:jsusta:v:10:y:2018:i:2:p:555-:d:132793 is not listed on IDEAS
    11. Rochecouste, Jean-Francois & Dargusch, Paul & Cameron, Donald & Smith, Carl, 2015. "An analysis of the socio-economic factors influencing the adoption of conservation agriculture as a climate change mitigation activity in Australian dryland grain production," Agricultural Systems, Elsevier, vol. 135(C), pages 20-30.
    12. Schimmelpfennig, David, 2016. "Farm Profits and Adoption of Precision Agriculture," Economic Research Report 249773, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
    13. Lisa Lobry de Bruyn & Susan Andrews, 2016. "Are Australian and United States Farmers Using Soil Information for Soil Health Management?," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 8(4), pages 1-33, March.
    14. Schipmann, Christin & Qaim, Matin, 2009. "Modern Supply Chains and Product Innovation: How Can Smallholder Farmers Benefit?," 2009 Conference, August 16-22, 2009, Beijing, China 51046, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    15. Pannell, David J. & Llewellyn, Rick S. & Corbeels, Marc, 2013. "The farm-level economics of conservation agriculture for resource-poor farmers," Working Papers 166526, University of Western Australia, School of Agricultural and Resource Economics.
    16. Alwin Keil & Alwin D’souza & Andrew McDonald, 2015. "Zero-tillage as a pathway for sustainable wheat intensification in the Eastern Indo-Gangetic Plains: does it work in farmers’ fields?," Food Security: The Science, Sociology and Economics of Food Production and Access to Food, Springer;The International Society for Plant Pathology, vol. 7(5), pages 983-1001, October.
    17. repec:eee:agisys:v:162:y:2018:i:c:p:123-135 is not listed on IDEAS
    18. Krishna, Vijesh V. & Veettil, Prakashan C., 2014. "Productivity and efficiency impacts of conservation tillage in northwest Indo-Gangetic Plains," Agricultural Systems, Elsevier, vol. 127(C), pages 126-138.
    19. Smith, Elwin G. & Carew, Richard & Warner, Kace, 2013. "Decision Making among Canola Growers in the Prairie Provinces: The Impact of Farm and Grower Characteristics," 2013 Annual Meeting, August 4-6, 2013, Washington, D.C. 149834, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    20. Schimmelpfennig, David & Ebel, Robert, 2016. "Sequential Adoption and Cost Savings from Precision Agriculture," Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Western Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 41(1), January.

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