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Adoption of Soil Conservation Measures in Manilla Shire, New South Wales


  • Sinden, Jack A.
  • King, David A.


Land in Manilla Shire, New South Wales, is characterised by serious soil erosion and land use is characterised by high rates of adoption of the recommended soil conservation measures. This behaviour is analysed to attempt to determine what factors are promoting soil conservation at each stage in the adoption process. The results suggest that policies to promote farmer perception of erosion problems should be formulated differently from those to promote actual adoption of the recommended measures. Perception of the problem depends mainly on the percentage of farm area that is eroded, but the likelihood of adoption depends mainly on the intensity of the erosion. The farmer's rating as an investor, the size and security of farm income, and the presence of institutional programmes are all significant factors which encourage adoption. While the stewardship motivation and personal factors encourage perception and recognition of a problem, economic factors promote actual adoption.

Suggested Citation

  • Sinden, Jack A. & King, David A., 1990. "Adoption of Soil Conservation Measures in Manilla Shire, New South Wales," Review of Marketing and Agricultural Economics, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society, vol. 58, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:remaae:12257

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Lindner, Robert K. & Pardey, Philip G. & Jarrett, Frank G., 1982. "Distance To Information Source And The Time Lag To Early Adoption Of Trace Element Fertilisers," Australian Journal of Agricultural Economics, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society, vol. 26(02), August.
    2. Christine A. Ervin & David E. Ervin, 1982. "Factors Affecting the Use of Soil Conservation Practices: Hypotheses, Evidence, and Policy Implications," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 58(3), pages 277-292.
    3. G. C. Kooten & W. Hartley Furtan, 1987. "A Review of Issues Pertaining to Soil Deterioration in Canada," Canadian Journal of Agricultural Economics/Revue canadienne d'agroeconomie, Canadian Agricultural Economics Society/Societe canadienne d'agroeconomie, vol. 35(1), pages 33-54, March.
    4. David A. King & J. A. Sinden, 1988. "Influence of Soil Conservation on Farm Land Values," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 64(3), pages 242-255.
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    1. Marra, Michele & Pannell, David J. & Abadi Ghadim, Amir, 2003. "The economics of risk, uncertainty and learning in the adoption of new agricultural technologies: where are we on the learning curve?," Agricultural Systems, Elsevier, vol. 75(2-3), pages 215-234.
    2. Llewellyn, Rick S. & Lindner, Robert K. & Pannell, David J. & Powles, Stephen B., 2002. "Adoption of herbicide resistance management practices by Australian grain growers," 2002 Conference (46th), February 13-15, 2002, Canberra 179527, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society.
    3. Marsh, Sally P. & Pannell, David J., 2000. "Agricultural extension policy in Australia: the good, the bad, and the misguided," Australian Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society, vol. 44(4), December.
    4. John W. Cary & Roger L. Wilkinson, 1997. "Perceived Profitability And Farmers' Conservation Behaviour," Journal of Agricultural Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 48(1-3), pages 13-21.
    5. Chouinard, Hayley H. & Wandschneider, Philip R. & Paterson, Tobias, 2016. "Inferences from sparse data: An integrated, meta-utility approach to conservation research," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 122(C), pages 71-78.
    6. Kopke, Emma & Young, John & Kingwell, Ross, 2008. "The relative profitability and environmental impacts of different sheep systems in a Mediterranean environment," Agricultural Systems, Elsevier, vol. 96(1-3), pages 85-94, March.
    7. Flett, Ross & Alpass, Fiona & Humphries, Steve & Massey, Claire & Morriss, Stuart & Long, Nigel, 2004. "The technology acceptance model and use of technology in New Zealand dairy farming," Agricultural Systems, Elsevier, vol. 80(2), pages 199-211, May.
    8. Miller, Elton N. & Andrews, Gregory, 1993. "Factors influencing landholders' investments in soil conservation activities," 1993 Conference (37th), February 9-11, 1993, Sydney, Australia 147759, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society.
    9. Pannell, David J., 1999. "Uncertainty and Adoption of Sustainable Farming Systems," 1999 Conference (43th), January 20-22, 1999, Christchurch, New Zealand 124511, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society.
    10. Trapnell, Lindsay & Malcolm, Bill, 2014. "Expected benefits on and off farm from including lucerne (Medicago sativa) in crop rotations on the Broken Plains of north-eastern Victoria," AFBM Journal, Australasian Farm Business Management Network, vol. 11.
    11. Grammatikopoulou, Ioanna & Pouta, Eija & Myyrä, Sami, 2014. "Exploring the determinants for adopting water conservation measures. What is the tendency of landowners when the resource is already at risk?," 2014 International Congress, August 26-29, 2014, Ljubljana, Slovenia 182703, European Association of Agricultural Economists.
    12. D'Emden, Francis H. & Llewellyn, Rick S. & Burton, Michael P., 2008. "Factors influencing adoption of conservation tillage in Australian cropping regions," Australian Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society, vol. 52(2), June.
    13. Bathgate, Andrew & Pannell, David J., 2002. "Economics of deep-rooted perennials in western Australia," Agricultural Water Management, Elsevier, vol. 53(1-3), pages 117-132, February.

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