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Investing in agrochemicals in the cocoa sector of Côte d’Ivoire: hypotheses, evidence and policy implications

  • Nkamleu, Guy Blaise
  • Keho, Yaya
  • Gockowski, Jim
  • David, Soniia

This paper presents empirical evidence to show how socioeconomic factors affect the adoption of and investment in agrochemicals in the cocoa sector of Côte d’Ivoire. The analysis uses primary farm-level data collected in 2002 from a nationally representative sample of more than one thousand cocoa farmers. The study describes the status of the adoption of various chemical inputs and uses a multiplicative heteroscedastic Tobit model to identify and quantify the impact of the socioeconomic environment on the incentive to invest. The results generally show that farmer, household and village characteristics are all important in explaining the farmers’ decisions. The paper concludes by outlining a number of implications for strategic targeting of farmers and locations. These should serve as entry points for a successful diffusion of efficient pest, disease and soil management programs.

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File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/14656/1/MPRA_paper_14656.pdf
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Paper provided by University Library of Munich, Germany in its series MPRA Paper with number 14656.

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Date of creation: 2007
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Publication status: Published in African Journal of Agriculture and Resource Economics 2.1(2007): pp. 145-166
Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:14656
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  1. Kebede, Yohannes & Gunjal, Kisan & Coffin, Garth, 1990. "Adoption of new technologies in Ethiopian agriculture: The case of Tegulet-Bulga district Shoa province," Agricultural Economics, Blackwell, vol. 4(1), pages 27-43, April.
  2. Asfaw, Abay & Admassie, Assefa, 2004. "The role of education on the adoption of chemical fertiliser under different socioeconomic environments in Ethiopia," Agricultural Economics, Blackwell, vol. 30(3), pages 215-228, May.
  3. Dhar, Tirtha & Chavas, Jean-Paul & Gould, Brian W., 2002. "An Empirical Assessment of Endogeneity Issues in Demand Analysis for Differentiated Products," Working Papers 201561, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Department of Agricultural and Applied Economics, Food System Research Group.
  4. Brian W. Gould, 2003. "An Empirical Assessment of Endogeneity Issues in Demand Analysis for Differentiated Products," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 85(3), pages 605-617.
  5. Guy B. Nkamleu & Anne Kielland, 2006. "Modeling farmers' decisions on child labor and schooling in the cocoa sector: a multinomial logit analysis in Côte d'Ivoire," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 35(3), pages 319-333, November.
  6. Feder, Gershon & Just, Richard E & Zilberman, David, 1985. "Adoption of Agricultural Innovations in Developing Countries: A Survey," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 33(2), pages 255-98, January.
  7. Kebede, Yohannes & Gunjal, Kisan & Coffin, Garth, 1990. "Adoption of New Technologies in Ethiopian Agriculture: The Case of Tegulet-Bulga District, Shoa Province," Agricultural Economics of Agricultural Economists, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 4(1), April.
  8. Guy Nkamleu, 2004. "Productivity Growth, Technical Progress and Efficiency Change in African Agriculture," African Development Review, African Development Bank, vol. 16(1), pages 203-222.
  9. Doss, Cheryl R. & Morris, Michael L., 2001. "How does gender affect the adoption of agricultural innovations?: The case of improved maize technology in Ghana," Agricultural Economics, Blackwell, vol. 25(1), pages 27-39, June.
  10. Otsuka, Keijiro & Suyanto, S. & Sonobe, Tetsushi & Tomich, Thomas P., 2001. "Evolution of land tenure institutions and development of agroforestry: evidence from customary land areas of Sumatra," Agricultural Economics of Agricultural Economists, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 25(1), June.
  11. Nkamleu, G. B. & Adesina, A. A., 2000. "Determinants of chemical input use in peri-urban lowland systems: bivariate probit analysis in Cameroon," Agricultural Systems, Elsevier, vol. 63(2), pages 111-121, February.
  12. Ransom, J.K. & Paudyal, K. & Adhikari, Keshav R., 2003. "Adoption of improved maize varieties in the hills of Nepal," Agricultural Economics of Agricultural Economists, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 29(3), December.
  13. Gockowski, James & Ndoumbe, Michel, 2004. "The adoption of intensive monocrop horticulture in southern Cameroon," Agricultural Economics, Blackwell, vol. 30(3), pages 195-202, May.
  14. Nkamleu, Guy Blaise, 2006. "Poverty and Child Farm Labor in Africa: Wealth Paradox or bad Orthodoxy," MPRA Paper 15105, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  15. Norris, Patricia E. & Batie, Sandra S., 1987. "Virginia Farmers' Soil Conservation Decisions: An Application Of Tobit Analysis," Southern Journal of Agricultural Economics, Southern Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 19(01), July.
  16. Norris, Patricia E. & Batie, Sandra S., 1987. "Virginia Farmers' Soil Conservation Decisions: An Application of Tobit Analysis," Journal of Agricultural and Applied Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 19(01), pages 79-90, July.
  17. Ransom, J. K. & Paudyal, K. & Adhikari, K., 2003. "Adoption of improved maize varieties in the hills of Nepal," Agricultural Economics, Blackwell, vol. 29(3), pages 299-305, December.
  18. Guy B. Nkamleu & Roger Tsafack Nanfosso, 2007. "On Measuring Indebtedness of African Countries," The African Finance Journal, Africagrowth Institute, vol. 9(1), pages 21-38.
  19. Holloway, Garth & Nicholson, Charles & Delgado, Chris & Staal, Steve & Ehui, Simeon, 2004. "A revised Tobit procedure for mitigating bias in the presence of non-zero censoring with an application to milk-market participation in the Ethiopian highlands," Agricultural Economics, Blackwell, vol. 31(1), pages 97-106, July.
  20. de Janvry, Alain & Fafchamps, Marcel & Sadoulet, Elisabeth, 1991. "Peasant Household Behaviour with Missing Markets: Some Paradoxes Explained," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 101(409), pages 1400-417, November.
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