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Determinants of fertilizer use on maize in Eastern Ethiopia: A weighted endogenous sampling analysis of the extent and intensity of adoption


  • Fufa, B.
  • Hassan, Rashid M.


Factors influencing the extent and intensity of fertilizer adoption on maize production in Ethiopia were analyzed. A Weighted Endogenous Sampling Maximum Likelihood estimator was used in the specification of a Probit and Tobit fertilizer adoption models. The results have important implications for the formulation of policies and programs targeted to promotion of fertilizer use in small-scale maize production. Those include improved road infrastructure, consideration of weather related crop failure insurance programs, development of drought tolerant cultivars and targeting particular farmer groups.

Suggested Citation

  • Fufa, B. & Hassan, Rashid M., 2006. "Determinants of fertilizer use on maize in Eastern Ethiopia: A weighted endogenous sampling analysis of the extent and intensity of adoption," Agrekon, Agricultural Economics Association of South Africa (AEASA), vol. 45(1), March.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:agreko:31734

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Kebede, Yohannes & Gunjal, Kisan & Coffin, Garth, 1990. "Adoption of new technologies in Ethiopian agriculture: The case of Tegulet-Bulga district Shoa province," Agricultural Economics, Blackwell, vol. 4(1), pages 27-43, April.
    2. Alene, Arega D. & Poonyth, Daneswar & Hassan, Rashid M., 2000. "Determinants of adoption and intensity of use of improved maize varieties in the Central Highlands of Ethiopia: A Tobit analysis," Agrekon, Agricultural Economics Association of South Africa (AEASA), vol. 39(4), December.
    3. Ephraim Nkonya & Ted Schroeder & David Norman, 1997. "Factors Affecting Adoption Of Improved Maize Seed And Fertiliser In Northern Tanzania," Journal of Agricultural Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 48(1-3), pages 1-12.
    4. Parikh, Ashok & Bernard, Andrew, 1988. "Impact of Risk on HYV Adoption in Bangladesh," Agricultural Economics of Agricultural Economists, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 2(2), October.
    5. McDonald, John F & Moffitt, Robert A, 1980. "The Uses of Tobit Analysis," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 62(2), pages 318-321, May.
    6. White, Halbert, 1982. "Maximum Likelihood Estimation of Misspecified Models," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 50(1), pages 1-25, January.
    7. Kebede, Yohannes & Gunjal, Kisan & Coffin, Garth, 1990. "Adoption of New Technologies in Ethiopian Agriculture: The Case of Tegulet-Bulga District, Shoa Province," Agricultural Economics of Agricultural Economists, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 4(1), April.
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    Cited by:

    1. Thuo, Mary & Bravo-Ureta, Boris E. & Hathie, Ibrahima & Obeng-Asiedu, Patrick, 2011. "Adoption of chemical fertilizer by smallholder farmers in the peanut basin of Senegal," African Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, African Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 6(1), March.
    2. Larson, Donald F. & Gurara, Daniel Zerfu, 2013. "A conceptual model of incomplete markets and the consequences for technology adoption policies in Ethiopia," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6681, The World Bank.
    3. Yonas Alem & Mintewab Bezabih & Menale Kassie & Precious Zikhali, 2010. "Does fertilizer use respond to rainfall variability? Panel data evidence from Ethiopia," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 41(2), pages 165-175, March.
    4. Birhanu, Mulugeta Yitayih & Girma, Anteneh & Puskur, Ranjitha, 2017. "Determinants of success and intensity of livestock feed technologies use in Ethiopia: Evidence from a positive deviance perspective," Technological Forecasting and Social Change, Elsevier, vol. 115(C), pages 15-25.
    5. repec:spr:ssefpa:v:9:y:2017:i:6:d:10.1007_s12571-017-0691-1 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Wakeyo, Mekonnen B. & Gardebroek, Cornelis, 2013. "Does water harvesting induce fertilizer use among smallholders? Evidence from Ethiopia," Agricultural Systems, Elsevier, vol. 114(C), pages 54-63.
    7. Wiredu, Alexander Nimo & Zeller, Manfred & Diagne, Aliou, 0. "What Determines Adoption of Fertilizers among Rice-Producing Households in Northern Ghana?," Quarterly Journal of International Agriculture, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, vol. 54.

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