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Deforestation And Agroforestry Adoption In Tropical Forests: Can We Generalize? Some Results From Campeche, Mexico And Rondonia, Brazil

  • Casey, James F.
  • Caviglia-Harris, Jill L.
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    The adoption of sustainable agriculture and other sustainable forestry methods that can help to reduce tropical deforestation have received a great deal of attention in the literature (Adesina and Zinnah 1993, Akinola and Young 1985, Feder and Slade 1984, Holden 1993, Kebede et al. 1990). Although results from different studies can be compared in an absolute sense, there are very few individual studies that compare results and determine, through empirical analysis, whether policy can be universally applied. This paper uses farm-level data to determine whether some universal conclusions can be drawn about the adoption of agroforestry by peasant farmers in developing countries by comparing the land use choices of farmers in Rondônia, Brazil and Campeche, Mexico. The empirical results indicate that education level and the degree of exposure to information about agroforestry significantly influence the adoption of agroforestry and that deforestation levels for farmers in both nations are influenced by the size of the farm lots. The two communities used in the analysis differ in terms of tradition, history, geography, and economics but both experience a link between deforestation and imperfect information. Policies that address imperfect information in developing countries are likely to decrease deforestation as well as improve the well being of residents.

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    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/36466
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    Paper provided by Western Agricultural Economics Association in its series 2000 Annual Meeting, June 29-July 1, 2000, Vancouver, British Columbia with number 36466.

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    Date of creation: 2000
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    Handle: RePEc:ags:waeava:36466
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://waeaonline.org/
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    1. Kebede, Yohannes & Gunjal, Kisan & Coffin, Garth, 1990. "Adoption of New Technologies in Ethiopian Agriculture: The Case of Tegulet-Bulga District, Shoa Province," Agricultural Economics of Agricultural Economists, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 4(1), April.
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    3. Kebede, Yohannes & Gunjal, Kisan & Coffin, Garth, 1990. "Adoption of new technologies in Ethiopian agriculture: The case of Tegulet-Bulga district Shoa province," Agricultural Economics, Blackwell, vol. 4(1), pages 27-43, April.
    4. Barbier, Edward B. & Burgess, J.C., 1996. "Economic analysis of deforestation in Mexico," MPRA Paper 12089, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. Deininger, Klaus W & Minten, Bart, 1999. "Poverty, Policies, and Deforestation: The Case of Mexico," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 47(2), pages 313-44, January.
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    7. Adesina, Akinwumi A. & Zinnah, Moses M., 1993. "Technology characteristics, farmers' perceptions and adoption decisions: A Tobit model application in Sierra Leone," Agricultural Economics of Agricultural Economists, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 9(4), December.
    8. Adesina, Akinwumi A. & Zinnah, Moses M., 1993. "Technology characteristics, farmers' perceptions and adoption decisions: A Tobit model application in Sierra Leone," Agricultural Economics, Blackwell, vol. 9(4), pages 297-311, December.
    9. Holden, Stein T., 1993. "Peasant household modelling: Farming systems evolution and sustainability in northern Zambia," Agricultural Economics, Blackwell, vol. 9(3), pages 241-267, September.
    10. Edward B. Barbier & Joanne C. Burgess, 1997. "The Economics of Tropical Forest Land Use Options," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 73(2), pages 174-195.
    11. Cropper, Maureen & Griffiths, Charles, 1994. "The Interaction of Population Growth and Environmental Quality," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 84(2), pages 250-54, May.
    12. Pfaff, Alexander S. P., 1999. "What Drives Deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon?: Evidence from Satellite and Socioeconomic Data," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 37(1), pages 26-43, January.
    13. Ehui, Simeon K. & Hertel, Thomas W. & Preckel, Paul V., 1990. "Forest resource depletion, soil dynamics, and agricultural productivity in the tropics," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 18(2), pages 136-154, March.
    14. Allen, Julia C., 1985. "Wood energy and preservation of woodlands in semi-arid developing countries: The case of Dodoma region, Tanzania," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 19(1-2), pages 59-84.
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