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Education and Innovation Adoption in Agriculture: Evidence from Hybrid Rice in China


  • Justin Yifu Lin



This paper uses the diffusion of F1 hybrid rice as a case for examining the effects of education on the adoption of new technology in China. A simple behavioral model that treats the adoption of hybrid rice as a portfolio selection problem is presented. The implications of the model are tested with farm-level data collected from a sample of 500 households in Hunan Province. The results from a dichotomous probit model and a two-limit tobit model are consistent with the hypothesis that education has a positive impact on the adoption of new technology.
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  • Justin Yifu Lin, 1990. "Education and Innovation Adoption in Agriculture: Evidence from Hybrid Rice in China," UCLA Economics Working Papers 603, UCLA Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:cla:uclawp:603

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    1. Lockheed, Marlaine E & Jamison, Dean T & Lau, Lawrence J, 1987. "Farmer Education and Farm Efficiency: Reply," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 35(3), pages 643-644, April.
    2. Lin, Justin Yifu, 1988. "The Household Responsibility System in China's Agricultural Reform: A Theoretical and Empirical Study," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 36(3), pages 199-224, Supplemen.
    3. Just, Richard E & Zilberman, David, 1983. "Stochastic Structure, Farm Size and Technology Adoption in Developing Agriculture," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 35(2), pages 307-328, July.
    4. N/A, 1985. "Asia," India Quarterly: A Journal of International Affairs, , vol. 41(1), pages 80-87, January.
    5. Feder, Gershon & Just, Richard E & Zilberman, David, 1985. "Adoption of Agricultural Innovations in Developing Countries: A Survey," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 33(2), pages 255-298, January.
    6. Richard R. Nelson & Edmond S. Phelps, 1965. "Investment in Humans, Technological Diffusion and Economic Growth," Cowles Foundation Discussion Papers 189, Cowles Foundation for Research in Economics, Yale University.
    7. Feder, Gershon, 1980. "Farm Size, Risk Aversion and the Adoption of New Technology under Uncertainty," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 32(2), pages 263-283, July.
    8. Schultz, Theodore W, 1975. "The Value of the Ability to Deal with Disequilibria," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 13(3), pages 827-846, September.
    9. Lin, Justin Yifu, 1991. "The household responsibility system reform and the adoption of hybrid rice in China," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 36(2), pages 353-372, October.
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    Cited by:

    1. Kimhi, Ayal & Rubin, Ofir D., 2006. "Assessing The Response Of Farm Households To Dairy Policy Reform In Israel," Discussion Papers 7134, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Department of Agricultural Economics and Management.
    2. El-Osta, Hisham S. & Morehart, Mitchell J., 1999. "Technology Adoption Decisions In Dairy Production And The Role Of Herd Expansion," Agricultural and Resource Economics Review, Northeastern Agricultural and Resource Economics Association, vol. 28(1), April.
    3. Blackman, Allen & Bannister, Geoffrey J., 1998. "Community Pressure and Clean Technology in the Informal Sector: An Econometric Analysis of the Adoption of Propane by Traditional Mexican Brickmakers," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 35(1), pages 1-21, January.
    4. Vanessa Carrión Yaguana & Jeffrey Alwang & George Norton & Victor Barrera, 2016. "Does IPM Have Staying Power? Revisiting a Potato-producing Area Years After Formal Training Ended," Journal of Agricultural Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 67(2), pages 308-323, June.
    5. Avila-Santamaria, Jorge J. & Useche, Maria P., 2016. "Urea Subsidies and the Decision to Allocate Land to a New Fertilizing Technology: Ex-ante Analysis in Ecuador," 2016 Annual Meeting, February 6-9, 2016, San Antonio, Texas 229851, Southern Agricultural Economics Association.
    6. B. Fosu-Mensah & P. Vlek & D. MacCarthy, 2012. "Farmers’ perception and adaptation to climate change: a case study of Sekyedumase district in Ghana," Environment, Development and Sustainability: A Multidisciplinary Approach to the Theory and Practice of Sustainable Development, Springer, vol. 14(4), pages 495-505, August.
    7. Xiaobo Zhang & Shenggen Fan & Ximing Cai, 2002. "The Path Of Technology Diffusion: Which Neighbors To Learn From?," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 20(4), pages 470-478, October.
    8. Xu, Pei & Wang, Zhigang, 2012. "Factors Affect Chinese Producers' Adoption of a New Production Technology: Survey Results from Chinese Fruits Producers," Agricultural Economics Review, Greek Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 13(2), June.
    9. Brewin, Derek G. & Omidvar, Vahid, 2008. "Innovation, Rurality and Human Capital in Food Processing," CAFRI: Current Agriculture, Food and Resource Issues, Canadian Agricultural Economics Society, issue 09.
    10. Liu, Jean & Chen, Kevin & Shi, Minjun, 2004. "Access to Information and the Adoption of Hybrid Maize: Evidence from China's Poor Areas," Japanese Journal of Rural Economics, Agricultural Economics Society of Japan (AESJ), vol. 6.

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