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Education and agricultural productivity: evidence from Uganda

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  • Simon Appleton
  • Arsène Balihuta

Abstract

Existing evidence on the impact of education on agricultural productivity in Africa is mixed, with estimates usually insignificant although sometimes large. Analysis of the first nationally representative household survey of Uganda gives an estimate of the impact of household primary schooling on crop production comparable to the developing country average. In addition, the primary schooling of neighbouring farm workers appears to raise crop production and these external returns exceed the internal returns. Education complements capital and substitutes for labour. Further productivity increases arise through education increasing physical capital and purchased inputs, but effects via crop choice appear negligible.

Suggested Citation

  • Simon Appleton & Arsène Balihuta, 1996. "Education and agricultural productivity: evidence from Uganda," CSAE Working Paper Series 1996-05, Centre for the Study of African Economies, University of Oxford.
  • Handle: RePEc:csa:wpaper:1996-05
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    References listed on IDEAS

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