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The Determinants Of Adoption Of Sustainable Agriculture Technologies: Evidence From The Hillsides Of Honduras

  • Arellanes, Peter
  • Lee, David R.
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    Recent years have seen a growth of interest in the adoption and diffusion of low-input sustainable agricultural technologies among smallholder agriculturalists in developing countries. This paper examines the adoption of one such technology, labranza minima, a form of minimum tillage, among resource-poor agricultural households in villages in central Honduras. Logistic regression is used to analyze the determinants of adoption of minimum tillage among a sample of 250 agricultural households. The results show that plots with irrigation, plots farmed by their owners and plots with steeper slopes were more likely canididates for minimum tillage adoption. Farmer household characteristics are not generally found to represent significant influences on adoption. Importantly, household income does not appar to be a determinant of adoption, suggesting that minimum tillage is an appropriate low-input technology for resource-poor households. The results also indicate that previous use of leguminous cover crops, soil amendments (including chemical fertilizers), and commercial vegetable production are all associated with minimum tillage adoption. Results from studies like this are useful in targeting low-input technologies and programs promoting them among the farm household population.

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    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/25826
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    Paper provided by International Association of Agricultural Economists in its series 2003 Annual Meeting, August 16-22, 2003, Durban, South Africa with number 25826.

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    Date of creation: 2003
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    Handle: RePEc:ags:iaae03:25826
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.iaae-agecon.org/
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    1. Polson, Rudulph A. & Spencer, Dunstan S. C., 1991. "The technology adoption process in subsistence agriculture: The case of cassava in Southwestern Nigeria," Agricultural Systems, Elsevier, vol. 36(1), pages 65-78.
    2. Ephraim Nkonya & Ted Schroeder & David Norman, 1997. "Factors Affecting Adoption Of Improved Maize Seed And Fertiliser In Northern Tanzania," Journal of Agricultural Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 48(1-3), pages 1-12.
    3. Neill, Sean P & Lee, David R, 2001. "Explaining the Adoption and Disadoption of Sustainable Agriculture: The Case of Cover Crops in Northern Honduras," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 49(4), pages 793-820, July.
    4. Clay, Daniel & Reardon, Thomas & Kangasniemi, Jaakko, 1998. "Sustainable Intensification in the Highland Tropics: Rwandan Farmers' Investments in Land Conservation and Soil Fertility," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 46(2), pages 351-77, January.
    5. Feder, Gershon, et al, 1992. "The Determinants of Farm Investment and Residential Construction in Post-Reform China," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 41(1), pages 1-26, October.
    6. Hwang, Sang Won & Alwang, Jeffrey & Norton, George W., 1994. "Soil conservation practices and farm income in the Dominican Republic," Agricultural Systems, Elsevier, vol. 46(1), pages 59-77.
    7. Feder, Gershon & Just, Richard E & Zilberman, David, 1985. "Adoption of Agricultural Innovations in Developing Countries: A Survey," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 33(2), pages 255-98, January.
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