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Agricultural Extension Service and Input Application Intensity: Evidence from Ethiopia

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  • Kidane Mariam Gebregziabher

Abstract

This paper examines factors that influence agricultural input adoption in the northern part of Ethiopia. Using a 730 households survey data set, a Tobit model is estimated to explain the factors that influence farmers’ decision to adopt modern inputs or not. The factors found to significantly influence included: plot size, oxen ownership, gender, age and literacy status of the household head, adult labor force, total non-farm income, extension service and location variables. The results confirm the adoption theory.

Suggested Citation

  • Kidane Mariam Gebregziabher, 2014. "Agricultural Extension Service and Input Application Intensity: Evidence from Ethiopia," Journal of Economics and Behavioral Studies, AMH International, vol. 6(9), pages 735-747.
  • Handle: RePEc:rnd:arjebs:v:6:y:2014:i:9:p:735-747
    DOI: 10.22610/jebs.v6i9.533.g533
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