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Factors influencing farmers’ adoption of modern rice technologies and good management practices in the Philippines

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  • Mariano, Marc Jim
  • Villano, Renato
  • Fleming, Euan

Abstract

We employ binary logit and Poisson estimators to model socioeconomic, institutional and environmental factors influencing the adoption of certified seeds, in particular, and integrated crop management practices, in general, in rice production in the Philippines. Estimates of factors influencing adoption are reasonably consistent between the two models but some differences are noted, particularly with respect to soil deficiencies and risk aversion. Results were found to be consistent between models in terms of the positive impacts on the adoption of certified seed technology and integrated crop management practices of farmers’ education, machinery ownership, irrigation water supply, capacity-enhancement activities and profit-oriented behavior. Conversely, soil and nutrient deficiencies are impediments to their adoption. Extension-related variables have the biggest impact on technology adoption.

Suggested Citation

  • Mariano, Marc Jim & Villano, Renato & Fleming, Euan, 2012. "Factors influencing farmers’ adoption of modern rice technologies and good management practices in the Philippines," Agricultural Systems, Elsevier, vol. 110(C), pages 41-53.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:agisys:v:110:y:2012:i:c:p:41-53
    DOI: 10.1016/j.agsy.2012.03.010
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