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Land Allocation, Soil Quality, And The Demand For Irrigation Technology

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  • Green, Gareth P.
  • Sunding, David L.

Abstract

Economists have long argued that increasing the price of agricultural water will encourage the adoption of efficient irrigation technologies. This article considers the choice of irrigation systems conditional on prior land allocation decisions. Adoption functions for gravity and low-pressure irrigation technologies are estimated for citrus and vineyards crops using a field-level data set from CaliforniaÂ’'s Central Valley. Results show that the influence of land quality and water price on low-pressure technology adoption is greater for citrus than for vineyard crops. Consequently, the response of growers to changes in policy will be conditional and land allocation.

Suggested Citation

  • Green, Gareth P. & Sunding, David L., 1997. "Land Allocation, Soil Quality, And The Demand For Irrigation Technology," Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Western Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 22(02), December.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:jlaare:30863
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. David Zilberman & Doug Parker, 1996. "Explaining Irrigation Technology Choices: A Microparameter Approach," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 78(4), pages 1064-1072.
    2. Bellon, Mauricio R & Taylor, J Edward, 1993. ""Folk" Soil Taxonomy and the Partial Adoption of New Seed Varieties," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 41(4), pages 763-786, July.
    3. Cason, Timothy N. & Uhlaner, Robert T., 1991. "Agricultural production's impact on water and energy demand: A choice modeling approach," Resources and Energy, Elsevier, vol. 13(4), pages 307-321, December.
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    Cited by:

    1. Shudong Zhou & Thomas Herzfeld & Thomas Glauben & Yunhua Zhang & Bingchuan Hu, 2008. "Factors Affecting Chinese Farmers' Decisions to Adopt a Water-Saving Technology," Canadian Journal of Agricultural Economics/Revue canadienne d'agroeconomie, Canadian Agricultural Economics Society/Societe canadienne d'agroeconomie, vol. 56(1), pages 51-61, March.
    2. Moreno, Georgina, 2005. "Intrafirm Effects on Water Conservation in Agriculture," 2005 Annual meeting, July 24-27, Providence, RI 19166, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
    3. Anderson, David P. & Wilson, Paul N. & Thompson, Gary D., 1999. "The Adoption And Diffusion Of Level Fields And Basins," Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Western Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 24(01), July.
    4. de Fraiture, Charlotte & Perry, C. J., 2007. "Why is agricultural water demand unresponsive at low price ranges?," IWMI Books, Reports H040602, International Water Management Institute.
    5. Moreno, Georgina & Sunding, David L., 2003. "Simultaneous Estimation Of Technology Adoption And Land Allocation," 2003 Annual meeting, July 27-30, Montreal, Canada 22134, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
    6. Moreno, Georgina & Sunding, David L., 2000. "Irrigation Technology Investment When The Price Of Water Is Stochastic," 2000 Annual meeting, July 30-August 2, Tampa, FL 21730, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
    7. Alcon, Francisco & Tapsuwan, Sorada & Martínez-Paz, José M. & Brouwer, Roy & de Miguel, María D., 2014. "Forecasting deficit irrigation adoption using a mixed stakeholder assessment methodology," Technological Forecasting and Social Change, Elsevier, vol. 83(C), pages 183-193.
    8. Mariano, Marc Jim & Villano, Renato & Fleming, Euan, 2012. "Factors influencing farmers’ adoption of modern rice technologies and good management practices in the Philippines," Agricultural Systems, Elsevier, vol. 110(C), pages 41-53.
    9. Schuck, Eric C. & Frasier, W. Marshall & Ebel, Robert & Houk, Eric & Green, Gareth, 2011. "Retirement and Salinity Effects on Irrigation Technology Choices," Western Economics Forum, Western Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 10(01).

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    Keywords

    Land Economics/Use;

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