IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/ags/aaea03/22134.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Simultaneous Estimation Of Technology Adoption And Land Allocation

Author

Listed:
  • Moreno, Georgina
  • Sunding, David L.

Abstract

The paper considers the econometric modeling of technology adoption when crop choice is simultaneous. Bivariate probit is used to estimate a model of irrigation technology choice and land allocation using a unique field-level data set from California's Central Valley. Special attention is paid to the proper calculation of marginal effects in the bivariate probit model, which are often useful for policy purposes. Estimation results confirm that the choices of irrigation technology and land allocation are simultaneous. With regard to the influence of price incentives on agricultural water use, estimation results from the bivariate probit model indicate that the influence of water price on the adoption of precision irrigation technology is much larger than previously realized. A univariate model of technology choice that treats land allocation as exogenous underestimates the effect of water price on the adoption of precision technology by over 40 percent.

Suggested Citation

  • Moreno, Georgina & Sunding, David L., 2003. "Simultaneous Estimation Of Technology Adoption And Land Allocation," 2003 Annual meeting, July 27-30, Montreal, Canada 22134, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:aaea03:22134
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/22134
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. David Zilberman & Doug Parker, 1996. "Explaining Irrigation Technology Choices: A Microparameter Approach," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 78(4), pages 1064-1072.
    2. Green, Gareth P. & Sunding, David L., 1997. "Land Allocation, Soil Quality, And The Demand For Irrigation Technology," Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Western Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 22(02), December.
    3. Margriet Caswell & David Zilberman, 1985. "The Choices of Irrigation Technologies in California," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 67(2), pages 224-234.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Goshu, Degye & Kassa, Belay & Ketema, Mengistu, 2013. "Is food security enhanced by agricultural technologies in rural Ethiopia?," African Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, African Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 8(1), July.
    2. Moreno, Georgina, 2005. "Intrafirm Effects on Water Conservation in Agriculture," 2005 Annual meeting, July 24-27, Providence, RI 19166, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
    3. Boris E. Bravo-Ureta & Horacio Cocchi & Daniel Solís, 2006. "Adoption of Soil Conservation Technologies in El Salvador: A Cross-Section and Over-Time Analysis," IDB Publications (Working Papers) 2894, Inter-American Development Bank.
    4. Boris Bravo & Horacio Cocchi & Daniel Solís, 2006. "Adoption of Soil Conservation Technologies in El Salvador: A cross-Section and Over-Time Analysis," OVE Working Papers 1806, Inter-American Development Bank, Office of Evaluation and Oversight (OVE).
    5. Cocchi, Horacio & Bravo-Ureta, Boris E. & Quiroga, Ricardo E., 2004. "Farm Benefits And Natural Resource Projects In Honduras And El Salvador," 2004 Annual meeting, August 1-4, Denver, CO 20328, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ags:aaea03:22134. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (AgEcon Search). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/aaeaaea.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.