IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/bla/agecon/v41y2010i1p67-79.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

The impact of integrated aquaculture-agriculture on small-scale farms in Southern Malawi

Author

Listed:
  • Madan M. Dey
  • Ferdinand J. Paraguas
  • Patrick Kambewa
  • Diemuth E. Pemsl

Abstract

Sustainable agricultural intensification is an urgent challenge for Sub-Saharan Africa. One potential solution is to rely on local farmers' knowledge for improved management of diverse on-farm resources and integration among various farm enterprises. In this article, we analyze the farm-level impact of one recent example, namely the integrated aquaculture-agriculture (IAA) technologies that have been developed and disseminated in a participatory manner in Malawi. Based on a 2004 survey of 315 respondents (166 adopters and 149 nonadopters), we test the hypothesis that adoption of IAA is associated with improved farm productivity and more efficient use of resources. Estimating a technical inefficiency function shows that IAA farms were significantly more efficient compared to nonadopters. IAA farms also had higher total factor productivity, higher farm income per hectare, and higher returns to family labor. Copyright (c) 2010 International Association of Agricultural Economists.

Suggested Citation

  • Madan M. Dey & Ferdinand J. Paraguas & Patrick Kambewa & Diemuth E. Pemsl, 2010. "The impact of integrated aquaculture-agriculture on small-scale farms in Southern Malawi," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 41(1), pages 67-79, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:agecon:v:41:y:2010:i:1:p:67-79
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/doi/abs/10.1111/j.1574-0862.2009.00426.x
    File Function: link to full text
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Awudu Abdulai & Wallace E. Huffman, 2005. "The Diffusion of New Agricultural Technologies: The Case of Crossbred-Cow Technology in Tanzania," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 87(3), pages 645-659.
    2. Thirtle, Colin & Lin, Lin & Piesse, Jenifer, 2003. "The Impact of Research-Led Agricultural Productivity Growth on Poverty Reduction in Africa, Asia and Latin America," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 31(12), pages 1959-1975, December.
    3. Pant, Jharendu & Demaine, Harvey & Edwards, Peter, 2005. "Bio-resource flow in integrated agriculture-aquaculture systems in a tropical monsoonal climate: a case study in Northeast Thailand," Agricultural Systems, Elsevier, vol. 83(2), pages 203-219, February.
    4. Foster, Andrew D & Rosenzweig, Mark R, 1995. "Learning by Doing and Learning from Others: Human Capital and Technical Change in Agriculture," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 103(6), pages 1176-1209, December.
    5. Hans P. Binswanger, 1980. "Attitudes Toward Risk: Experimental Measurement in Rural India," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 62(3), pages 395-407.
    6. Zeddies, Jurgen & Schaab, R.P. & Neuenschwander, P. & Herren, H.R., 2001. "Economics of biological control of cassava mealybug in Africa," Agricultural Economics of Agricultural Economists, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 24(2), January.
    7. Renkow, Mitch, 1994. "Technology, production environment, and household income: Assessing the regional impacts of technological change," Agricultural Economics of Agricultural Economists, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 10(3), May.
    8. Alston, Julian M. & Wyatt, T. J. & Pardey, Philip G. & Marra, Michele C. & Chan-Kang, Connie, 2000. "A meta-analysis of rates of return to agricultural R & D: ex pede Herculem?," Research reports 113, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    9. Coelli, Tim J., 1995. "Recent Developments In Frontier Modelling And Efficiency Measurement," Australian Journal of Agricultural Economics, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society, vol. 39(03), December.
    10. Rauniyar, Ganesh P & Goode, Frank M, 1996. "Managing Green Revolution Technology: An Analysis of a Differential Practice Combination in Swaziland," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 44(2), pages 413-437, January.
    11. Hansen, J.D. & Luckert, M.K. & Minae, S. & Place, F., 2005. "Tree planting under customary tenure systems in malawi: impacts of marriage and inheritance patterns," Agricultural Systems, Elsevier, vol. 84(1), pages 99-118, April.
    12. Wilson, Paul & Hadley, David & Asby, Carol, 2001. "The influence of management characteristics on the technical efficiency of wheat farmers in eastern England," Agricultural Economics, Blackwell, vol. 24(3), pages 329-338, March.
    13. Zvi Griliches, 1958. "Research Costs and Social Returns: Hybrid Corn and Related Innovations," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 66, pages 419-419.
    14. Jules Pretty, 1999. "Can Sustainable Agriculture Feed Africa? New Evidence on Progress, Processes and Impacts," Environment, Development and Sustainability: A Multidisciplinary Approach to the Theory and Practice of Sustainable Development, Springer, vol. 1(3), pages 253-274, September.
    15. Raitzer, David A. & Kelley, Timothy G., 2008. "Benefit-cost meta-analysis of investment in the International Agricultural Research Centers of the CGIAR," Agricultural Systems, Elsevier, vol. 96(1-3), pages 108-123, March.
    16. Prein, M., 2002. "Integration of aquaculture into crop-animal systems in Asia," Agricultural Systems, Elsevier, vol. 71(1-2), pages 127-146.
    17. Jonathan Kydd & Andrew Dorward & Jamie Morrison & Georg Cadisch, 2004. "Agricultural development and pro-poor economic growth in sub-Saharan Africa: potential and policy," Oxford Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 32(1), pages 37-57.
    18. Mukhopadhyay, Sudhin K, 1994. "Adapting Household Behavior to Agricultural Technology in West Bengal, India: Wage Labor, Fertility, and Child Schooling Determinants," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 43(1), pages 91-115, October.
    19. Brummett, Randall E. & Noble, R., 1995. "Aquaculture for African smallholders," Technical Reports 44729, Worldfish Center.
    20. Cragg, John G, 1971. "Some Statistical Models for Limited Dependent Variables with Application to the Demand for Durable Goods," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 39(5), pages 829-844, September.
    21. Masters, William A. & Bedingar, Touba & Oehmke, James F., 1998. "The impact of agricultural research in Africa: aggregate and case study evidence," Agricultural Economics, Blackwell, vol. 19(1-2), pages 81-86, September.
    22. Shujie Yao & Zinan Liu, 1998. "Determinants of Grain Production and Technical Efficiency in China," Journal of Agricultural Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 49(2), pages 171-184.
    23. Byerlee, Derek & Heisey, Paul W., 1996. "Past and potential impacts of maize research in sub-Saharan Africa: a critical assessment," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 21(3), pages 255-277, July.
    24. Feder, Gershon & Just, Richard E & Zilberman, David, 1985. "Adoption of Agricultural Innovations in Developing Countries: A Survey," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 33(2), pages 255-298, January.
    25. Bindlish, Vishva & Evenson, Robert E, 1997. "The Impact of T&V Extension in Africa: The Experience of Kenya and Burkina Faso," World Bank Research Observer, World Bank Group, vol. 12(2), pages 183-201, August.
    26. Adesina, Akinwumi A. & Baidu-Forson, Jojo, 1995. "Farmers' perceptions and adoption of new agricultural technology: evidence from analysis in Burkina Paso and Guinea, West Mrica," Agricultural Economics of Agricultural Economists, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 13(1), October.
    27. George E. Battese & Sohail J. Malik & Manzoor A. Gill, 1996. "An Investigation Of Technical Inefficiencies Of Production Of Wheat Farmers In Four Districts Of Pakistan," Journal of Agricultural Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 47(1-4), pages 37-49.
    28. Heckman, James J, 1974. "Shadow Prices, Market Wages, and Labor Supply," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 42(4), pages 679-694, July.
    29. Paul Wilson & Dave Hadley & Stephen Ramsden & Ioannis Kaltsas, 1998. "Measuring and Explaining Technical Efficiency in UK Potato Production," Journal of Agricultural Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 49(3), pages 294-305.
    30. George Battese & Sumiter Broca, 1997. "Functional Forms of Stochastic Frontier Production Functions and Models for Technical Inefficiency Effects: A Comparative Study for Wheat Farmers in Pakistan," Journal of Productivity Analysis, Springer, vol. 8(4), pages 395-414, November.
    31. Norton, George W. & Davis, Jeffrey S., 1979. "Review Of Methods Used To Evaluate Returns To Agricultural Research," Staff Papers 13520, University of Minnesota, Department of Applied Economics.
    32. Brummett, R.E. & Noble, R., 1995. "Aquaculture for African smallholders," Working Papers, The WorldFish Center, number 9978, September.
    33. George W. Norton & Jeffrey S. Davis, 1981. "Evaluating Returns to Agricultural Research: A Review," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 63(4), pages 685-699.
    34. David G. Abler & Vasant A. Sukhatme, 2006. "The “Efficient but Poor” Hypothesis ," Review of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 28(3), pages 338-343.
    35. Lisa A. Cameron, 1999. "The Importance of Learning in the Adoption of High-Yielding Variety Seeds," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 81(1), pages 83-94.
    36. Rukuni, Mandivamba & Blackie, Malcolm J. & Eicher, Carl K., 1998. "Crafting smallholder-driven agricultural research systems in Southern Africa," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 26(6), pages 1073-1087, June.
    37. Amemiya, Takeshi, 1974. "Multivariate Regression and Simultaneous Equation Models when the Dependent Variables Are Truncated Normal," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 42(6), pages 999-1012, November.
    38. Asfaw, Abay & Admassie, Assefa, 2004. "The role of education on the adoption of chemical fertiliser under different socioeconomic environments in Ethiopia," Agricultural Economics, Blackwell, vol. 30(3), pages 215-228, May.
    39. Johannes Sauer & Klaus Frohberg & Henrich Hockmann, 2006. "Stochastic efficiency measurement: The curse of theoretical consistency," Journal of Applied Economics, Universidad del CEMA, vol. 9, pages 139-166, May.
    40. Battese, G E & Coelli, T J, 1995. "A Model for Technical Inefficiency Effects in a Stochastic Frontier Production Function for Panel Data," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 20(2), pages 325-332.
    41. Bauer, Paul W., 1990. "Recent developments in the econometric estimation of frontiers," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 46(1-2), pages 39-56.
    42. Adesina, Akinwumi A. & Baidu-Forson, Jojo, 1995. "Farmers' perceptions and adoption of new agricultural technology: evidence from analysis in Burkina Faso and Guinea, West Africa," Agricultural Economics, Blackwell, vol. 13(1), pages 1-9, October.
    43. Michael Lipton & Saurabh Sinha & Rachel Blackman, 2002. "Reconnecting Agricultural Technology to Human Development," Journal of Human Development and Capabilities, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 3(1), pages 123-152.
    44. George E. Battese, 1997. "A Note On The Estimation Of Cobb-Douglas Production Functions When Some Explanatory Variables Have Zero Values," Journal of Agricultural Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 48(1-3), pages 250-252.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. repec:bla:agecon:v:48:y:2017:i:3:p:291-299 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. repec:eee:wdevel:v:99:y:2017:i:c:p:42-59 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Béné, Christophe & Arthur, Robert & Norbury, Hannah & Allison, Edward H. & Beveridge, Malcolm & Bush, Simon & Campling, Liam & Leschen, Will & Little, David & Squires, Dale & Thilsted, Shakuntala H. &, 2016. "Contribution of Fisheries and Aquaculture to Food Security and Poverty Reduction: Assessing the Current Evidence," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 79(C), pages 177-196.
    4. Tran, N. & Crissman, C. & Chijere, A. & Hong, M.C. & Teoh, S.J. & Valdivia, R.O., 2013. "Ex-ante assessment of integrated aquaculture-agriculture adoption and impact in Southern Malawi," Working Papers, The WorldFish Center, number 40078, September.
    5. Murshed-E-Jahan, K. & Crissman, C. & Antle, J., 2013. "Economic and social impacts of Integrated Aquaculture-Agriculture technologies in Bangladesh," Working Papers, The WorldFish Center, number 40077, September.
    6. Randall Brummett, 2011. "Growing Fish to Make Money in Africa," World Bank Other Operational Studies 10427, The World Bank.
    7. Phu Nguyen-Van & Cyrielle Poiraud & Nguyen To-The, 2017. "Modeling farmers’ decisions on tea varieties in Vietnam: a multinomial logit analysis," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 48(3), pages 291-299, May.
    8. Islam, Abu Hayat, 2015. "Can Integrated Rice-Fish System Increase Welfare of the Marginalized Extreme Poor in Bangladesh? A DID Matching Approach," 2015 Conference, August 9-14, 2015, Milan, Italy 211792, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    9. Jessica Blythe, 2013. "Social-ecological analysis of integrated agriculture-aquaculture systems in Dedza, Malawi," Environment, Development and Sustainability: A Multidisciplinary Approach to the Theory and Practice of Sustainable Development, Springer, vol. 15(4), pages 1143-1155, August.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:bla:agecon:v:41:y:2010:i:1:p:67-79. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Wiley-Blackwell Digital Licensing) or (Christopher F. Baum). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/iaaeeea.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.