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Agricultural Development And Pro Poor Economic Growth In Sub Saharan Africa: Potential And Policy

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  • Kydd, Jonathan
  • Dorward, Andrew
  • Morrison, Jamie
  • Cadisch, Georg

Abstract

There is widespread concern at continuing, and indeed deepening, poverty in sub-Saharan Africa, and the lack of processes of rapid and broad based economic growth to combat this. There is also debate about the role agriculture in driving pro-poor economic growth with some arguing that it has a critical role in this while others see it is as largely irrelevant. This paper examines these arguments. We summarise and critique what we term the Washington Consensus on Agriculture (a consensus that appears to be eroding) and alternative positions opposing investment in agriculture. We suggest that both sets of arguments pay insufficient attention to important institutional issues in development, and, having taken these into account, we conclude that agriculture has a critical role to play, largely by default as there are no other candidates with the same potential for supporting broad based pro-poor growth. However, there are immense challenges to agricultural growth, challenges that in some cases may be too great to be economically viable. In considering economic viability, however, regard must be taken of the economic and social costs of rural stagnation and of providing safety nets in situations of enduring poverty. Policy needs to focus more on agriculture, and recognise and address the diversity of institutional, trade, technological and governance challenges to poverty reducing growth in Africa.

Suggested Citation

  • Kydd, Jonathan & Dorward, Andrew & Morrison, Jamie & Cadisch, Georg, 2002. "Agricultural Development And Pro Poor Economic Growth In Sub Saharan Africa: Potential And Policy," ADU Working Papers 10920, Imperial College at Wye, Department of Agricultural Sciences.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:icwywp:10920
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Christian K.M. Kingombe, 2012. "The Linkage between Outcome Differences in Cotton Production and Rural Roads Improvements - A Matching Approach," IHEID Working Papers 12-2012, Economics Section, The Graduate Institute of International Studies.
    2. Somlanare Romuald KINDA & Félix BADOLO, 2014. "Climatic Variability and Food Security in Developing Countries," Working Papers 201405, CERDI.
    3. Farrow, Andrew & Risinamhodzi, Kumbirai & Zingore, Shamie & Delve, Robert J., 2011. "Spatially targeting the distribution of agricultural input stockists in Malawi," Agricultural Systems, Elsevier, vol. 104(9), pages 694-702.
    4. Somlanare Romuald Kinda, 2016. "Climatic shocks and food security: The role of foreign aid," Working Papers hal-01260846, HAL.
    5. Romero, Cristina & Wollni, Meike, 2015. "Supplier dynamics in horticultural export chains – Evidence from Ecuador. Revised version," Discussion Papers 209961, Georg-August-Universitaet Goettingen, GlobalFood, Department of Agricultural Economics and Rural Development.
    6. Kelly, Valerie & Adesina, Akinwumi A. & Gordon, Ann, 2003. "Expanding access to agricultural inputs in Africa: a review of recent market development experience," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 28(4), pages 379-404, August.
    7. Catherine Boone, 2017. "Legal empowerment of the poor through property rights reform: Tensions and trade-offs of land registration and titling in sub-Saharan Africa," WIDER Working Paper Series 037, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    8. Kinda Somlanare Romuald, 2017. "Working Paper 286 - Climatic Shocks and Food Security The Role of Foreign Aid," Working Paper Series 2408, African Development Bank.
    9. Badolo, Felix & Kinda, Somlanare Romuald, 2012. "Climatic shocks and food security in developing countries," MPRA Paper 43006, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    10. Conceição, Pedro & Levine, Sebastian & Lipton, Michael & Warren-Rodríguez, Alex, 2016. "Toward a food secure future: Ensuring food security for sustainable human development in Sub-Saharan Africa," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 60(C), pages 1-9.
    11. Kelly, Valerie A., 2005. "Farmers' Demand for Fertilizer in Sub-Saharan Africa," Staff Papers 11612, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    12. Nin Pratt, Alejandro & Diao, Xinshen, 2008. "Exploring Growth Linkages and Market Opportunities for Agriculture in Southern Africa," Journal of Economic Integration, Center for Economic Integration, Sejong University, vol. 23, pages 104-137.
    13. Christian K.M. Kingombe & Salvatore di Falco, 2012. "The Impact of a Feeder Road Project on Cash Crop Production in Zambia’s Eastern Province between 1997 and 2002, Labour Market and Fiscal Policy," IHEID Working Papers 04-2012, Economics Section, The Graduate Institute of International Studies, revised 28 Feb 2012.
    14. Jorg Mayer & Pilar Fajarnes, 2008. "Tripling Africa's Primary Exports: What, How, Where?," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 44(1), pages 80-102.
    15. Wambugu, Stella N. & Okello, Julius Juma & Nyikal, Rose Adhiambo & Bekele, Shiferaw, 2009. "Effect of Social Capital on Performance of Smallholder Producer Organizations: The Case of Groundnut Growers in Western Kenya," 2009 Conference, August 16-22, 2009, Beijing, China 51466, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    16. Rainer Klump & César Miralles Cabrera, 2008. "Biased Technological Change in Agriculture: The Hayami-Ruttan Hypothesis Revisited," DEGIT Conference Papers c013_016, DEGIT, Dynamics, Economic Growth, and International Trade.
    17. Madan M. Dey & Ferdinand J. Paraguas & Patrick Kambewa & Diemuth E. Pemsl, 2010. "The impact of integrated aquaculture-agriculture on small-scale farms in Southern Malawi," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 41(1), pages 67-79, January.

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