IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/eee/jfpoli/v35y2010i3p185-194.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Policies to promote cereal intensification in Ethiopia: The search for appropriate public and private roles

Author

Listed:
  • Spielman, David J.
  • Byerlee, Derek
  • Alemu, Dawit
  • Kelemework, Dawit

Abstract

Over the past decade, policymakers have been searching for an appropriate blend of public and private sector roles to accelerate the intensification of food staple production, smallholder commercialization, and sustainable market development in sub-Saharan Africa. In Ethiopia, steps taken to liberalize markets in the 1990s and promote fertilizer and seed packages have yet to generate payoffs in terms of higher cereal yields, lower food prices, or reduced dependency on food aid. This raises concern about the performance of the agricultural sector, specifically in terms of the systems for providing improved seed, fertilizer, credit, and extension services. This paper examines the evolving roles of the public and private sectors in intensifying cereal production in Ethiopia. Findings suggest that while Ethiopia has an admirable record of supporting agriculture, its state-led policies has now outlived their usefulness. These findings for Ethiopia offer lessons that are potentially applicable to other sub-Saharan African countries facing similar challenges.

Suggested Citation

  • Spielman, David J. & Byerlee, Derek & Alemu, Dawit & Kelemework, Dawit, 2010. "Policies to promote cereal intensification in Ethiopia: The search for appropriate public and private roles," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 35(3), pages 185-194, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jfpoli:v:35:y:2010:i:3:p:185-194
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0306-9192(10)00009-6
    Download Restriction: Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Jayne, T. S. & Govereh, J. & Wanzala, M. & Demeke, M., 2003. "Fertilizer market development: a comparative analysis of Ethiopia, Kenya, and Zambia," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 28(4), pages 293-316, August.
    2. Ariga, Joshua & Jayne, Thom S. & Nyoro, James K., 2006. "Factors Driving the Growth in Fertilizer Consumption in Kenya, 1990-2005: Sustaining the Momentum in Kenya and Lessons for Broader Replicability in Sub-Saharan Africa," Working Papers 202619, Egerton University, Tegemeo Institute of Agricultural Policy and Development.
    3. Heisey, Paul W. & Norton, George W., 2007. "Fertilizers and other farm chemicals," Handbook of Agricultural Economics, Elsevier.
    4. Dorward, Andrew & Fan, Shenggen & Kydd, Jonathan & Lofgren, Hans & Morrison, Jamie & Poulton, Colin & Rao, Neetha & Smith, Laurence & Tchale, Hardwick & Thorat, Sukhadeo & Urey, Ian & Wobst, Peter, 2004. "Institutions and economic policies for pro-poor agricultural growth," DSGD discussion papers 15, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    5. Ulimwengu, John M. & Workneh, Sindu & Paulos, Zelekawork, 2009. "Impact of soaring food price in Ethiopia: Does location matter?," IFPRI discussion papers 846, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    6. Dercon, Stefan & Christiaensen, Luc, 2011. "Consumption risk, technology adoption and poverty traps: Evidence from Ethiopia," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 96(2), pages 159-173, November.
    7. Jonathan Kydd & Andrew Dorward, 2004. "Implications of market and coordination failures for rural development in least developed countries," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 16(7), pages 951-970.
    8. Harrigan, Jane, 2008. "Food insecurity, poverty and the Malawian Starter Pack: Fresh start or false start?," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 33(3), pages 237-249, June.
    9. Jayne, T. S. & Govereh, J. & Mwanaumo, A. & Nyoro, J. K. & Chapoto, A., 2002. "False Promise or False Premise? The Experience of Food and Input Market Reform in Eastern and Southern Africa," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 30(11), pages 1967-1985, November.
    10. Crawford, Eric & Kelly, Valerie & Jayne, T. S. & Howard, Julie, 2003. "Input use and market development in Sub-Saharan Africa: an overview," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 28(4), pages 277-292, August.
    11. Barrett, Christopher B., 2008. "Smallholder market participation: Concepts and evidence from eastern and southern Africa," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 33(4), pages 299-317, August.
    12. Freeman, H. Ade & Kaguongo, Wachira, 2003. "Fertilizer market liberalization and private retail trade in Kenya," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 28(5-6), pages 505-518.
    13. Ahmed, Raisuddin, 1995. "Liberalization of agricultural input markets in Bangladesh: process, impact, and lessons," Agricultural Economics, Blackwell, vol. 12(2), pages 115-128, August.
    14. Rashid, Shahidur & Assefa, Meron & Ayele, Gezahegn, 2007. "Distortions to Agricultural Incentives in Ethiopia," Agricultural Distortions Working Paper Series 48519, World Bank.
    15. Doss, Cheryl R. & Mwangi, Wilfred & Verkuijl, Hugo & De Groote, Hugo, 2003. "Adoption Of Maize And Wheat Technologies In Eastern Africa: A Synthesis Of The Findings Of 22 Case Studies," Economics Working Papers 46522, CIMMYT: International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center.
    16. Ahmed, Raisuddin, 1995. "Liberalization of agricultural input markets in Bangladesh: process, impact, and lessons," Agricultural Economics of Agricultural Economists, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 12(2), August.
    17. Langyintuo, Augustine S. & Mwangi, Wilfred & Diallo, Alpha O. & MacRobert, John F. & Dixon, John & Banziger, Marianne, 2008. "An analysis of the bottlenecks affecting the production and deployment of maize seed in Eastern and Southern Africa," Economics Program Papers 56189, CIMMYT: International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center.
    18. Kherallah, Mylène & Delgado, Christopher L. & Gabre-Madhin, Eleni Z. & Minot, Nicholas & Johnson, Michael, 2000. "The road half traveled," Issue briefs 2, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
      • Kherallah, Mylène & Delgado, Christopher L. & Gabre-Madhin, Eleni Z. & Minot, Nicholas. & Johnson, Michael., 2000. "The road half traveled," Food policy reports 10, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    19. Howard, Julie & Crawford, Eric & Kelly, Valerie & Demeke, Mulat & Jeje, Jose Jaime, 2003. "Promoting high-input maize technologies in Africa: the Sasakawa-Global 2000 experience in Ethiopia and Mozambique," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 28(4), pages 335-348, August.
    20. Omamo, Steven Were & Mose, Lawrence O., 2001. "Fertilizer trade under market liberalization: preliminary evidence from Kenya," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 26(1), pages 1-10, February.
    21. Byerlee, Derek & Jayne, T.S. & Myers, Robert J., 2006. "Managing food price risks and instability in a liberalizing market environment: Overview and policy options," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 31(4), pages 275-287, August.
    22. Cummings, Ralph Jr. & Rashid, Shahidur & Gulati, Ashok, 2006. "Grain price stabilization experiences in Asia: What have we learned?," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 31(4), pages 302-312, August.
    23. Lantican, Maximina A. & Dubin, H. Jesse & Morris, Michael L., 2005. "Impacts of International Wheat Breeding Research in the Developing World, 1988-2002," Impact Studies 7654, CIMMYT: International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center.
    24. Tripp, Robert & Louwaars, Niels, 1997. "Seed regulation: choices on the road to reform," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 22(5), pages 433-446, October.
    25. Michael Morris & Valerie A. Kelly & Ron J. Kopicki & Derek Byerlee, 2007. "Fertilizer Use in African Agriculture : Lessons Learned and Good Practice Guidelines," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 6650, November.
    26. Davis, Kristin & Ekboir, Javier & Mekasha, Wendmsyamregne & Ochieng, Cosmas M.O. & Spielman, David J. & Zerfu, Elias, 2007. "Strengthening agricultural education and training in Sub-Saharan Africa from an innovation systems perspective: Case studies of Ethiopia and Mozambique," IFPRI discussion papers 736, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eee:jfpoli:v:35:y:2010:i:3:p:185-194. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Dana Niculescu). General contact details of provider: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/foodpol .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.