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On the central role of small farms in African rural development strategies

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  • Larson,Donald F.
  • Muraoka,Rie
  • Otsuka,Keijiro

Abstract

Improving the productivity of smallholder farms in Sub-Saharan Africa offers the best chance to reduce poverty among this generation of rural poor, by building on the limited resources farming households already possess. It is also the best and shortest path to meet rising food needs. Using examples from farmers'maize and rice fields, and comparisons with Asia, this paper examines why the set of technologies promoted to date have produced localized successes rather than transformational change. The paper explains the limitations of alternative policies that are not centered on small farms. It provides indicative examples of how resource-management technologies can supplement seed-fertilizer technologies to speed an African Green Revolution.

Suggested Citation

  • Larson,Donald F. & Muraoka,Rie & Otsuka,Keijiro, 2016. "On the central role of small farms in African rural development strategies," Policy Research Working Paper Series 7710, The World Bank.
  • Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:7710
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Kamel Louhichi & Umed Temursho & Liesbeth Colen & Sergio Gomez y Paloma, 2019. "Upscaling the productivity performance of the Agricultural Commercialization Cluster Initiative in Ethiopia [Élargissement des performance de productivité de l'Initiative des grappes de Commerciali," Working Papers hal-02790390, HAL.
    2. Kruseman, Gideon & Dermawan, Ahmad & Diagne, Mandiaye & Enahoro, Dolapo & Frija, Aymen & Gatto, Marcel & Gbegbelegbe, Sika & Komarek, Adam M. & Mausch, Kai & Mottaleb, Khondoker, 2021. "Foresight for income and employment: What can we learn for agricultural research for development," SocArXiv 783rw, Center for Open Science.
    3. World Bank Group, "undated". "Africa's Pulse, No. 14, October 2016," World Bank Publications - Reports 25097, The World Bank Group.

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