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The Possibility of a Green Revolution in Sub-Saharan Africa: Evidence from Kenya

Author

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  • Keijiro Otsuka

    () (Foundation for Advanced Studies on International Development, Tokyo)

  • Takashi Yamano

Abstract

It is widely believed that a Green Revolution similar to the one achieved in Asia is impossible in Sub-Saharan Africa. Although grain yields have been stagnant in this region, there are some signs of the intensification of farming systems in the face of growing population pressure on limited land resources. In this paper we focus on the new farming system based on the use of manure produced by dairy cows, which may be termed an “Organic Green Revolution.” Using the farm household data collected from Kenya, this paper demonstrates that the Organic Green Revolution has a potential of doubling maize yields in highlands of Kenya.

Suggested Citation

  • Keijiro Otsuka & Takashi Yamano, 2005. "The Possibility of a Green Revolution in Sub-Saharan Africa: Evidence from Kenya," The Electronic Journal of Agricultural and Development Economics, Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, vol. 2(1), pages 7-19.
  • Handle: RePEc:fao:tejade:v:2:y:2005:i:1:p:7-19
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Haggblade, Steven, ed., 2004. "Building on successes in African agriculture:," 2020 vision focus 12, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    2. Gabre-Madhin, Eleni Z. & Haggblade, Steven, 2003. "Successes in African agriculture," MSSD discussion papers 53, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    3. C. Peter Timmer, 1969. "The Turnip, the New Husbandry, and the English Agricultural Revolution," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 83(3), pages 375-395.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Keijiro Otsuka, 2006. "Cluster-Based Industrial Development: A View From East Asia," The Japanese Economic Review, Japanese Economic Association, vol. 57(3), pages 361-376.
    2. Evita Pangaribowo & Nicolas Gerber & Pascal Tillie, 2013. "Assessing the FNS impacts of technological and institutional innovations and future innovation trends," FOODSECURE Working papers 11, LEI Wageningen UR.
    3. Nakano, Yuko & Tsusaka, Takuji W. & Aida, Takeshi & Pede, Valerien O., 2015. "The Impact of Training on Technology Adoption and Productivity of Rice Farming in Tanzania: Is Farmer-to-Farmer Extension Effective?," Working Papers 90, JICA Research Institute.
    4. Jia, Xiangping, 2009. "Synergistic Green and White Revolution: Evidence from Kenya and Uganda," 2009 Conference, August 16-22, 2009, Beijing, China 51367, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    5. Larson,Donald F. & Muraoka,Rie & Otsuka,Keijiro, 2016. "On the central role of small farms in African rural development strategies," Policy Research Working Paper Series 7710, The World Bank.
    6. Kijima, Yoko & Ito, Yukinori & Otsuka, Keijiro, 2012. "Assessing the Impact of Training on Lowland Rice Productivity in an African Setting: Evidence from Uganda," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 40(8), pages 1610-1618.
    7. Wouter Zant, 2014. "Do Organic Inputs in African Subsistence Agriculture Raise Productivity? Evidence from Plot Data of Malawi Household Surveys," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 14-114/V, Tinbergen Institute.
    8. Kijima, Yoko & Ito, Yukinori & Otsuka, Keijiro, 2010. "On the Possibility of a Lowland Rice Green Revolution in Sub-Saharan Africa:," Working Papers 25, JICA Research Institute.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Green Revolution; Agricultural Revolution; Organic Green Revolution; dairy cows; manure; chemical fertilizer; maize yield;

    JEL classification:

    • Q10 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - General
    • Q16 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - R&D; Agricultural Technology; Biofuels; Agricultural Extension Services

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