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The Burkinabè Cotton Story 1992-2007: Sustainable Success or Sub-Saharan Mirage?

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  • Kaminski, Jonathan
  • Headey, Derek
  • Bernard, Tanguy

Abstract

Summary Like many other African countries in the early 1990s, Burkina Faso was urged to engage in a far-reaching liberalization of its state-led cotton sector. Instead it engaged in more gradual and sequenced reforms characterized by institutional innovations and partial privatization. But while the reforms coincided with a threefold increase in cotton exports in the space of a decade, there is heated debate about whether the reforms truly induced sustainable growth. In addition to reviewing existing evidence, this paper develops a counterfactual analysis to more rigorously assess the reform's impacts after accounting for the confounding influence of exogenous shocks and centrally administered farmgate prices. The paper shows that while many elements of the reform process did achieve important economic objectives, return migration from Côte d'Ivoire explains around a third of production growth, financial elements of the reforms were not fully sustainable, and institutional arrangements failed to fully empower cotton farmers.

Suggested Citation

  • Kaminski, Jonathan & Headey, Derek & Bernard, Tanguy, 2011. "The Burkinabè Cotton Story 1992-2007: Sustainable Success or Sub-Saharan Mirage?," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 39(8), pages 1460-1475, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:wdevel:v:39:y:2011:i:8:p:1460-1475
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Easterly, William & Kremer, Michael & Pritchett, Lant & Summers, Lawrence H., 1993. "Good policy or good luck?: Country growth performance and temporary shocks," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(3), pages 459-483, December.
    2. Jean-Pierre Lachaud, 2005. "A la recherche de l’insaisissable dynamique de pauvreté au Burkina Faso. Une nouvelle évidence empirique," Documents de travail 117, Groupe d'Economie du Développement de l'Université Montesquieu Bordeaux IV.
    3. Brambilla, Irene & Porto, Guido, 2005. "Farm Productivity and Market Structure: Evidence from Cotton Reforms in Zambia," Working Papers 5, Yale University, Department of Economics.
    4. Bernard, Tanguy & Collion, Marie-Hélène & de Janvry, Alain & Rondot, Pierre & Sadoulet, Elisabeth, 2008. "Do Village Organizations Make a Difference in African Rural Development? A Study for Senegal and Burkina Faso," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 36(11), pages 2188-2204, November.
    5. Gabre-Madhin, Eleni Z. & Haggblade, Steven, 2004. "Successes in African Agriculture: Results of an Expert Survey," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 32(5), pages 745-766, May.
    6. Gabre-Madhin, Eleni Z. & Haggblade, Steven, 2003. "Successes in African agriculture," MSSD discussion papers 53, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    7. Irene Brambilla & Guido G. Porto, 2005. "Farm Productivity and Market Structure. Evidence From Cotton Reforms in Zambia," Working Papers 919, Economic Growth Center, Yale University.
    8. Jonathan Kaminski & Alban Thomas, 2011. "Land Use, Production Growth, and the Institutional Environment of Smallholders: Evidence from Burkinabè Cotton Farmers," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 87(1), pages 160-182.
    9. David Tschirley & Colin Poulton & Patrick Labaste, 2009. "Organization and Performance of Cotton Sectors in Africa : Learning from Reform Experience," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 2604.
    10. Gray, Leslie C. & Kevane, Michael, 2001. "Evolving Tenure Rights and Agricultural Intensification in Southwestern Burkina Faso," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 29(4), pages 573-587, April.
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    Cited by:

    1. Delpeuch, Claire & Vandeplas, Anneleen, 2013. "Revisiting the “Cotton Problem”—A Comparative Analysis of Cotton Reforms in Sub-Saharan Africa," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 42(C), pages 209-221.
    2. Brian Dowd-Uribe, 2014. "Liberalisation Failed: Understanding Persistent State Power in the Burkinabè Cotton Sector from 1990 to 2004," Development Policy Review, Overseas Development Institute, vol. 32(5), pages 545-566, September.
    3. Cornelia Staritz & Susan Newman & Bernhard Tröster & Leonhard Plank, 2015. "Financialisation, price risks, and global commodity chains: Distributional implications on Cotton Sectors in Sub-Saharan Africa," Working Papers 2015/04, Maastricht School of Management.
    4. Staritz, Cornelia & Newman, Susan & Tröster, Bernhard & Plank, Leonhard, 2015. "Financialization, price risks, and global commodity chains: Distributional implications on cotton sectors in Sub-Saharan Africa," Working Papers 55, Österreichische Forschungsstiftung für Internationale Entwicklung (ÖFSE) / Austrian Foundation for Development Research.
    5. repec:oup:ajagec:v:99:y:2017:i:1:p:34-54. is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Delpeuch, Claire & Leblois, Antoine, 2014. "The Elusive Quest for Supply Response to Cash-Crop Market Reforms in Sub-Saharan Africa: The Case of Cotton," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 64(C), pages 521-537.
    7. Emmanuel Tumusiime & B. Wade Brorsen & Jeffrey D. Vitale, 2014. "Vertical integration in West Africa's cotton industry: are parastatals a second best solution?," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 45(S1), pages 129-143, November.
    8. Harounan Kazianga & Francis Makamu, 2017. "Crop Choice, School Participation, and Child Labor in Developing Countries: Cotton Expansion in Burkina Faso," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 99(1), pages 34-54.
    9. Bassett, Thomas J., 2014. "Capturing the Margins: World Market Prices and Cotton Farmer Incomes in West Africa," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 59(C), pages 408-421.
    10. Daniel Etongo & Ida Nadia S. Djenontin & Markku Kanninen, 2016. "Poverty and Environmental Degradation in Southern Burkina Faso: An Assessment Based on Participatory Methods," Land, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 5(3), pages 1-23, June.
    11. Delpeuch, Claire, 2011. "African cotton markets at crossroads : will the price spike turn into a new kick-start ?," Policy Research Working Paper Series 5847, The World Bank.
    12. Simon Lange & Malte Reimers, 2014. "Livestock as an Imperfect Buffer Stock in Poorly Integrated Markets," Courant Research Centre: Poverty, Equity and Growth - Discussion Papers 162, Courant Research Centre PEG.

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