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The Impact of Training on Technology Adoption and Productivity of Rice Farming in Tanzania: Is Farmer-to-Farmer Extension Effective?

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  • Nakano, Yuko
  • Tsusaka, Takuji W.
  • Aida, Takeshi
  • Pede, Valerien O.

Abstract

How far can new technologies taught to a small number of selected farmers diffuse to other farmers in a village? In order to answer this question, this paper investigates the impact of JICA training on the adoption of rice cultivation technologies and productivity in an irrigation scheme in Tanzania. By using a unique five-year panel data set and spatial econometric techniques, we found that non-trained farmers learned new technologies from trained farmers through social networks and by observing their plots. As a result, the paddy yield of directly trained farmers increased from 3.1 tons per hectare in 2008 to 4.7 tons per hectare in 2012, while that of non-trained farmers increased from around 2.6 tons per hectare in 2008 to 3.7 tons per hectare in 2012.

Suggested Citation

  • Nakano, Yuko & Tsusaka, Takuji W. & Aida, Takeshi & Pede, Valerien O., 2015. "The Impact of Training on Technology Adoption and Productivity of Rice Farming in Tanzania: Is Farmer-to-Farmer Extension Effective?," Working Papers 90, JICA Research Institute.
  • Handle: RePEc:jic:wpaper:90
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10685/153
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    File URL: https://jicari.repo.nii.ac.jp/?action=repository_uri&item_id=742&file_id=9&file_no=1
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    Cited by:

    1. Yoko Kijima, 2018. "Long-term and Spillover Effects of Rice Production Training in Uganda," Working Papers 161, JICA Research Institute.
    2. repec:gam:jsusta:v:11:y:2019:i:9:p:2610-:d:228737 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Tsusaka, Takuji W. & Kajisa, Kei & Pede, Valerien O. & Aoyagi, Keitaro, 2015. "Neighborhood effects and social behavior: The case of irrigated and rainfed farmers in Bohol, the Philippines," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 118(C), pages 227-246.
    4. Fisher, Monica & Holden, Stein T. & Katengeza, Samson P., 2017. "Adoption of CA technologies among Followers of Lead Farmers: How Strong is the Influence from Lead Farmers?," CLTS Working Papers 7/17, Norwegian University of Life Sciences, Centre for Land Tenure Studies.

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    Keywords

    technology adoption ; agricultural training ; social learning; rice ; Sub-Saharan Africa;

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