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Overview of the agricultural input sector in Ghana


  • Krausova, Marika
  • Banful, Afua Branoah


Knowledge of the characteristics and size of the agricultural input sector of a country is critical for policymakers to design appropriate interventions that not only foster growth in the sector, but also support the agricultural development goals of the country. In 2009, the International Food Policy Research Institute and the International Fertilizer Development Center jointly conducted a census of agricultural input dealers in Ghana to fill a critical data gap on the nature of the country’s agricultural input sector. This paper presents a detailed description of the sector’s structure, market practices, and supply chain. It also assesses the sector’s response to recently implemented fertilizer subsidies, and findings show that, despite the government’s goal of making the subsidy program supportive of the private market, the majority of fertilizer retailers were excluded from participating.

Suggested Citation

  • Krausova, Marika & Banful, Afua Branoah, 2010. "Overview of the agricultural input sector in Ghana," IFPRI discussion papers 1024, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  • Handle: RePEc:fpr:ifprid:1024

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Ariga, Joshua & Jayne, Thomas S. & Nyoro, James K., 2006. "Factors Driving the Growth in Fertilizer Consumption in Kenya, 1990-2005: Sustaining the Momentum in Kenya and Lessons for Broader Replicability in Sub-Saharan Africa," Food Security Collaborative Working Papers 55167, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    2. Minot, Nicholas & Benson, Todd, 2009. "Fertilizer subsidies in Africa: Are vouchers the answer?," Issue briefs 60, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    3. Crawford, Eric & Kelly, Valerie & Jayne, T. S. & Howard, Julie, 2003. "Input use and market development in Sub-Saharan Africa: an overview," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 28(4), pages 277-292, August.
    4. Ariga, Joshua & Jayne, Thomas S., 2009. "Private sector responses to public investments and policy reforms: The case of fertilizer and maize market development in Kenya," IFPRI discussion papers 921, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
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    Cited by:

    1. Banful, Afua Branoah, 2011. "Old Problems in the New Solutions? Politically Motivated Allocation of Program Benefits and the "New" Fertilizer Subsidies," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 39(7), pages 1166-1176, July.
    2. Bumb, Balu L. & Johnson, Michael E. & Fuentes, Porfirio A., 2011. "Policy options for improving regional fertilizer markets in West Africa:," IFPRI discussion papers 1084, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    3. Tripp, Robert & Mensah-Bonsu, Akwesi, 2013. "Ghana's commercial seed sector: New incentives or continued complacency?:," GSSP working papers 32, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    4. Lenis Saweda O. Liverpool-Tasie, 2014. "Fertilizer subsidies and private market participation: the case of Kano State, Nigeria," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 45(6), pages 663-678, November.

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    agricultural input sector; fertilizer; agro-dealers network; vouchers; subsidies;

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