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Conceptualizing drivers of policy change in agriculture, nutrition, and food security: The kaleidoscope model:

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  • Resnick, Danielle
  • Babu, Suresh Chandra
  • Haggblade, Steven
  • Hendriks, Sheryl
  • Mather, David

Abstract

The current emphasis in the development community on demonstrating policy impact requires a better understanding of national policymaking processes to recognize opportunities for, and limits to, generating policy change. Consequently, this paper introduces an applied framework, named the kaleidoscope model, to analyze drivers of change in the food security arena, with a specific emphasis on agriculture and nutrition policies. Focusing on five key elements of the policy cycle—agenda setting, design, adoption, implementation, and evaluation and reform—the model identifies key variables that define the necessary and sufficient conditions for policy change to occur. These variables were inductively derived through an extensive review of the secondary literature on episodes of policy change in developing countries across a broad range of policy domains related to food security, including agriculture, education, healthcare, nutrition, and social protection.

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  • Resnick, Danielle & Babu, Suresh Chandra & Haggblade, Steven & Hendriks, Sheryl & Mather, David, 2015. "Conceptualizing drivers of policy change in agriculture, nutrition, and food security: The kaleidoscope model:," IFPRI discussion papers 1414, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  • Handle: RePEc:fpr:ifprid:1414
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    Cited by:

    1. Steven Haggblade & Danielle Resnick, 2018. "Conceptualizing Key Drivers of Policy Change: An Introduction to the Kaleidoscope Model," Feed the Future Innovation Lab for Food Security Policy Research Briefs 303565, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics, Feed the Future Innovation Lab for Food Security (FSP).
    2. Gillespie, Stuart & van den Bold, Mara, 2015. "Stories of change in nutrition: A tool pool:," IFPRI discussion papers 1494, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    3. Ogunlesi, Ayodeji & Bokana, Koye & Okoye, Chidozie & Loy, Jens-Peter, 2018. "Agricultural Productivity and Food Supply Stability in Sub-Saharan Africa: LSDV and SYS-GMM Approach," MPRA Paper 90204, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Haggblade, Steven & Babu, Suresh & Harris, Jody & Mkandawire, Elizabeth & Nthani, Dorothy & Hendriks, Sheryl L., 2016. "Drivers of Micronutrient Policy Change in Zambia: An Application of the Kaleidoscope Model," Food Security Collaborative Working Papers 245110, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    5. Bordignon, Jacopo & Breisinger, Clemens, 2015. "Policy changes in times of crisis: Evidence from the Arab Spatial Policy Analyzer:," IFPRI discussion papers 1471, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    6. Naomi Hossain, 2018. "How the international media framed ‘food riots’ during the global food crises of 2007–12," Food Security: The Science, Sociology and Economics of Food Production and Access to Food, Springer;The International Society for Plant Pathology, vol. 10(3), pages 677-688, June.
    7. Resnick, Danielle & Mason, Nicole M., 2016. "What drives input subsidy policy reform? The case of Zambia, 2002–2016," IFPRI discussion papers 1572, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    8. Resnick, Danielle & Mather, David, 2016. "Agricultural inputs policy under macroeconomic uncertainty: Applying the kaleidoscope model to Ghana’s Fertilizer Subsidy Programme (2008–2015):," IFPRI discussion papers 1551, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    9. Babu, Suresh Chandra & Haggblade, Steven & Mkandawire, Elizabeth & Nankhuni, Flora & Hendriks, Sheryl L., 2016. "Micronutrient policy process in Malawi:," IFPRI discussion papers 1568, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    10. Joana Silva & Victoria Levin & Matteo Morgandi, 2013. "Inclusion and Resilience : The Way Forward for Social Safety Nets in the Middle East and North Africa," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 14064.

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    Keywords

    food security; Agricultural policies; Nutrition policies; Nutrition security;
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