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Out of the shadow of famine: evolving food markets and food policy in Bangladesh

Editor

Listed:
  • Ahmed, Raisuddin
  • Haggblade, Steven
  • Chowdhury, Tawfiq-e-Elahi

Abstract

This book describes how Bangladesh transformed its food markets and food policies to free the country from the constant threat of famine. Since 1990, the Bangladeshi government has dismantled its food rationing system, privatized grain distribution, eased restrictions on international trade, and reduced its own presence in grain markets. The foundation for these developments was laid in the preceding decades. Improvements in agricultural science in the 1970s roughly doubled farm yields, while in the 1980s liberalization of irrigation restrictions, the lifting of import barriers to irrigation technology, and the privatization of fertilizer distribution rapidly increased rice cultivation. These increases in production, coupled with improvements in infrastructure and a more slowly growing and increasingly urban population, have substantially changed the structure of food grain markets, leading to increased marketing volumes, lower prices, and significantly larger private grain stocks. The book sets the Bangladeshi case in the larger context of the South Asian subcontinent and other developing countries in Asia. The authors examine the shifting structure of supply and demand in the grain markets, the history of government intervention in those markets, and the more recent changes that altered the arguments for such intervention and led to policy changes. The case of Bangladesh also has more general relevance as a study of the outcomes of a market-oriented reform program.

Suggested Citation

  • Ahmed, Raisuddin & Haggblade, Steven & Chowdhury, Tawfiq-e-Elahi (ed.), 2000. "Out of the shadow of famine: evolving food markets and food policy in Bangladesh," IFPRI books, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI), number 0-8018-6476-3, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:fpr:ifprib:0801864763
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Headey, Derek D. & Hoddinott, John, 2016. "Agriculture, nutrition and the green revolution in Bangladesh," Agricultural Systems, Elsevier, vol. 149(C), pages 122-131.
    2. Dorosh, Paul A. & Rashid, Shahidur & Childs, Abigail & Van Asselt, Joanna, 2015. "Enhancing food security in South Sudan: The role of public food stocks and cereal imports:," IFPRI discussion papers 1482, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    3. Resnick, Danielle & Babu, Suresh & Haggblade, Steven & Hendriks, Sheryl L. & Mather, David, 2015. "Conceptualizing Drivers Of Policy Change In Agriculture, Nutrition, And Food Security: The Kaleidoscope Model," Feed the Future Innovation Lab for Food Security Policy Research Papers 258732, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics, Feed the Future Innovation Lab for Food Security (FSP).
    4. Mohinder S. Mudahar & Raisuddin Ahmed, 2010. "Government and Rural Transformation : Role of Public Spending and Policies in Bangladesh," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 16356, Juni.
    5. Haggblade, Steven & Boughton, Duncan, 2013. "A Strategic Agricultural Sector and Food Security Diagnostic for Myanmar," Food Security International Development Working Papers 161372, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    6. Resnick, Danielle & Haggblade, Steven & Babu, Suresh & Hendriks, Sheryl L. & Mather, David, 2018. "The Kaleidoscope Model of policy change: Applications to food security policy in Zambia," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 109(C), pages 101-120.
    7. Ahmed, Nazneen & Bakht, Zaid & Dorosh, Paul A. & Shahabuddin, Quazi, 2007. "Distortions to Agricultural Incentives in Bangladesh," Agricultural Distortions Working Paper Series 48481, World Bank.
    8. Babu, Suresh Chandra & Dorosh, Paul A., 2017. "From famine to food security: Lessons for building resilient food systems:," Policy briefs 978-089629-288-8, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    9. Zahidul Islam, K.M. & Sumelius, John & B├Ąckman, Stefan, 2012. "Do differences in technical efficiency explain the adoption rate of HYV rice? Evidence from Bangladesh," Agricultural Economics Review, Greek Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 13(1), pages 1-18.

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