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A Strategic Agricultural Sector and Food Security Diagnostic for Myanmar

Listed author(s):
  • Haggblade, Steven
  • Boughton, Duncan

Despite its enormous potential, Myanmar’s agriculture has underperformed over the past fifty years. Today, per capita earnings in agriculture average roughly $200 a year, one-half to one-third of the levels achieved by its regional peers. Given that two-thirds of the population works primarily in agriculture, low farm productivity translates into high rates of poverty and food insecurity. Currently, about one quarter of the population falls below the national poverty line. As a result, in spite of national rice self-sufficiency, food security for many households and individuals remains elusive. Poor households spend over 70% of their income on food. In addition, fully one-third of rural households borrow at some point during the year in order to purchase food. Even after shouldering this heavy financial burden, up to one-half of rural households report having to navigate two months each year without adequate food supplies, leaving one-third of the country’s children stunted.

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File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/161372
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Paper provided by Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics in its series Food Security International Development Working Papers with number 161372.

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Date of creation: Jul 2013
Handle: RePEc:ags:midiwp:161372
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Justin S. Morrill Hall of Agriculture, 446 West Circle Dr., Rm 202, East Lansing, MI 48824-1039

Phone: (517) 355-4563
Fax: (517) 432-1800
Web page: http://www.aec.msu.edu/agecon/
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  1. World Bank, 2012. "2012 Information and Communications for Development : Maximizing Mobile," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 11958, September.
  2. Ahmed, Raisuddin & Haggblade, Steven & Chowdhury, Tawfiq-e-Elahi (ed.), 2000. "Out of the shadow of famine: evolving food markets and food policy in Bangladesh," IFPRI books, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI), number 0-8018-6476-3.
  3. Surabhi Mittal & Sanjay Gandhi & Gaurav Tripathi, 2010. "Socio-Economic Impact of Mobile Phones on Indian Agriculture," Development Economics Working Papers 23031, East Asian Bureau of Economic Research.
  4. Jenny C. Aker, 2010. "Information from Markets Near and Far: Mobile Phones and Agricultural Markets in Niger," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 2(3), pages 46-59, July.
  5. Muto, Megumi & Yamano, Takashi, 2009. "The Impact of Mobile Phone Coverage Expansion on Market Participation: Panel Data Evidence from Uganda," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 37(12), pages 1887-1896, December.
  6. Hossain, Mahabub, 1988. "Nature and impact of the Green Revolution in Bangladesh:," Research reports 67, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  7. Jayne, Thomas S. & Rashid, Shahidur, 2010. "The Value of Accurate Crop Production Forecasts," Food Security International Development Working Papers 97032, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
  8. Michael Lipton, 2012. "Learning From Others: Increasing Agricultural Productivity for Human Development in Sub-Saharan Africa," UNDP Africa Policy Notes 2012-007, United Nations Development Programme, Regional Bureau for Africa.
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