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Learning From Others: Increasing Agricultural Productivity for Human Development in Sub-Saharan Africa

  • Michael Lipton

    (Sussex University)

This paper looks at the condition and progress of SSA's agriculture as central to growth, poverty reduction, access to employment income, and food security. Agriculture also greatly affects other major components of SSA's human development.

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File URL: http://web.undp.org/africa/knowledge/WP-2012-007-Lipton-Agriculture-Productivity.pdf
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Paper provided by United Nations Development Programme, Regional Bureau for Africa in its series UNDP Africa Policy Notes with number 2012-007.

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Length: 52 pages
Date of creation: Jan 2012
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:rac:wpaper:2012-007
Contact details of provider: Postal: One United Nations Plaza, New York, New York 10017
Web page: http://www.africa.undp.org/

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  1. Francesco Caselli, 2007. "The Marginal Product of Capital," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 122(2), pages 535-568, 05.
  2. Robert Eastwood & Johann Kirsten & Michael Lipton, 2006. "Premature deagriculturalisation? Land inequality and rural dependency in Limpopo province, South Africa," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 42(8), pages 1325-1349.
  3. Martin Ravallion & Shaohua Chen & Prem Sangraula, 2007. "New Evidence on the Urbanization of Global Poverty," Population and Development Review, The Population Council, Inc., vol. 33(4), pages 667-701.
  4. Fan, Shenngen & Hazell, Peter & Haque, T., 2000. "Targeting public investments by agro-ecological zone to achieve growth and poverty alleviation goals in rural India," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 25(4), pages 411-428, August.
  5. Hossain, Mahabub, 1988. "Nature and impact of the Green Revolution in Bangladesh:," Research reports 67, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  6. Ariga, Joshua & Jayne, Thomas S., 2009. "Private sector responses to public investments and policy reforms: The case of fertilizer and maize market development in Kenya," IFPRI discussion papers 921, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  7. Fan, Shenggen & Zhang, Linxiu & Zhang, Xiaobo, 2000. "Growth and poverty in rural China: the role of public investments," EPTD discussion papers 66, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  8. Lipton, Michael, 1988. "The place of agricultural research in the development of sub-Saharan Africa," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 16(10), pages 1231-1257, October.
  9. Asenso-Okyere, Kwadwo & Asante, Felix A. & Tarekegn, Jifar & Andam, Kwaw S., 2009. "The linkages between agriculture and malaria: Issues for policy, research, and capacity strengthening," IFPRI discussion papers 861, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
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