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Learning From Others: Increasing Agricultural Productivity for Human Development in Sub-Saharan Africa

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  • Michael Lipton

    (Sussex University)

Abstract

This paper looks at the condition and progress of SSA's agriculture as central to growth, poverty reduction, access to employment income, and food security. Agriculture also greatly affects other major components of SSA's human development.

Suggested Citation

  • Michael Lipton, "undated". "Learning From Others: Increasing Agricultural Productivity for Human Development in Sub-Saharan Africa," UNDP Africa Policy Notes 2012-007, United Nations Development Programme, Regional Bureau for Africa.
  • Handle: RePEc:rac:wpaper:2012-007
    as

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    File URL: http://web.undp.org/africa/knowledge/WP-2012-007-Lipton-Agriculture-Productivity.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Francesco Caselli & James Feyrer, 2007. "The Marginal Product of Capital," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 122(2), pages 535-568.
    2. Lipton, Michael, 1988. "The place of agricultural research in the development of sub-Saharan Africa," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 16(10), pages 1231-1257, October.
    3. Martin Ravallion & Shaohua Chen & Prem Sangraula, 2007. "New Evidence on the Urbanization of Global Poverty," Population and Development Review, The Population Council, Inc., vol. 33(4), pages 667-701, December.
    4. Fan, Shenngen & Hazell, Peter & Haque, T., 2000. "Targeting public investments by agro-ecological zone to achieve growth and poverty alleviation goals in rural India," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 25(4), pages 411-428, August.
    5. Hussain, Intizar, 2005. "Pro-poor intervention strategies in irrigated agriculture in Asia: poverty in irrigated agriculture: issues, lessons, options and guidelines: Bangladesh, China, India, Indonesia, Pakistan and Vietnam.," IWMI Research Reports H037150, International Water Management Institute.
    6. Ariga, Joshua & Jayne, Thomas S., 2009. "Private sector responses to public investments and policy reforms: The case of fertilizer and maize market development in Kenya," IFPRI discussion papers 921, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    7. Robert Eastwood & Johann Kirsten & Michael Lipton, 2006. "Premature deagriculturalisation? Land inequality and rural dependency in Limpopo province, South Africa," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 42(8), pages 1325-1349.
    8. Asenso-Okyere, Kwadwo & Asante, Felix A. & Tarekegn, Jifar & Andam, Kwaw S., 2009. "The linkages between agriculture and malaria: Issues for policy, research, and capacity strengthening," IFPRI discussion papers 861, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    9. Luc Christiaensen & Lionel Demery, 2007. "Down to Earth : Agriculture and Poverty Reduction in Africa," World Bank Publications - Books, The World Bank Group, number 6624.
    10. World Bank, 2009. "Nigeria - Employment and Growth Study," World Bank Publications - Reports 3165, The World Bank Group.
    11. Shaohua Chen & Martin Ravallion, 2010. "The Developing World is Poorer than We Thought, But No Less Successful in the Fight Against Poverty," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 125(4), pages 1577-1625.
    12. Fan, Shenggen & Zhang, Linxiu & Zhang, Xiaobo, 2000. "Growth and poverty in rural China: the role of public investments," EPTD discussion papers 66, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    13. Hossain, Mahabub, 1988. "Nature and impact of the Green Revolution in Bangladesh:," Research reports 67, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    14. Michael Lipton & Saurabh Sinha & Rachel Blackman, 2002. "Reconnecting Agricultural Technology to Human Development," Journal of Human Development and Capabilities, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 3(1), pages 123-152.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Nin-Pratt, Alejandro & McBride, Linden, 2014. "Agricultural intensification in Ghana: Evaluating the optimist’s case for a Green Revolution," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 48(C), pages 153-167.
    2. Eicher, Carl & Haggblade, Steven, 2013. "The Evolution of Agricultural Education and Training: Global Insights of Relevance for Africa," Food Security Collaborative Working Papers 183417, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    3. Steven Glover & Sam Jones, 2016. "Can commercial farming promote rural dynamism in sub-Saharan Africa? Evidence from Mozambique," WIDER Working Paper Series 120, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    4. Haggblade, Steven & Boughton, Duncan, 2013. "A Strategic Agricultural Sector and Food Security Diagnostic for Myanmar," Food Security International Development Working Papers 161372, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    5. Conceição, Pedro & Levine, Sebastian & Lipton, Michael & Warren-Rodríguez, Alex, 2016. "Toward a food secure future: Ensuring food security for sustainable human development in Sub-Saharan Africa," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 60(C), pages 1-9.
    6. N'Dede Hourizene, Cynthia B. & Wilson, Norbert, 2016. "Contributing to Economic and Social Development in Sub-Saharan Africa through Value-Added Agriculture," 2017 Annual Meeting, February 4-7, 2017, Mobile, Alabama 252792, Southern Agricultural Economics Association.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    North-South; growth model; innovation assimilation;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles
    • R10 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - General

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