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Agricultural infrastructure donation performance: Empirical evidence in rural Ethiopia

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  • Urquía-Grande, Elena
  • Rubio-Alcocer, Antonio

Abstract

Research literature is trying to find linkages in Ethiopia to increase economical outcomes of smallholders’ agriculture. This project focuses in the performance analysis of an infrastructure donation. The infrastructure donation is a hand-dug well donated by an NGO shared by 4 families in Ethiopia. Each family has the responsibility to create a vegetable farm and cultivate different crops in order to improve nutrition for the family while developing an economic commitment of selling the excess crops. The sample is taken from 106 hand-dug wells involving 424 families in three villages near Addis Ababa where agriculture is the main activity.

Suggested Citation

  • Urquía-Grande, Elena & Rubio-Alcocer, Antonio, 2015. "Agricultural infrastructure donation performance: Empirical evidence in rural Ethiopia," Agricultural Water Management, Elsevier, vol. 158(C), pages 245-254.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:agiwat:v:158:y:2015:i:c:p:245-254
    DOI: 10.1016/j.agwat.2015.04.020
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