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Enhancing food security in South Sudan: The role of public food stocks and cereal imports:

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  • Dorosh, Paul A.
  • Rashid, Shahidur
  • Childs, Abigail
  • Van Asselt, Joanna

Abstract

South Sudan faces serious problems of food insecurity due to low per capita levels of domestic food production, periodic droughts, widespread poverty, political unrest, and since late 2013, renewed armed conflict. Agricultural productivity is low, and the country is highly dependent on private-sector imports of cereals (maize, sorghum, wheat, and rice) from Uganda to supply domestic markets. National household survey data indicate substantial diversity in consumption of cereals across households, and our econometric estimates suggest highly price- and income-inelastic demand for the two major cereals, sorghum and maize. Drawing on a review of international experience and the constraints facing South Sudan, we conclude that a national food security reserve (NFSR) system with a small national food security stock is feasible for South Sudan. Cereal stocks would be kept mainly for targeted safety nets and emergency distribution, and market interventions would be limited in scope, in keeping with a long-run goal of market development. Nonetheless, even with a functioning NFSR, promotion of private-sector domestic and import trade will remain crucial for ensuring adequate supplies of grain and food security

Suggested Citation

  • Dorosh, Paul A. & Rashid, Shahidur & Childs, Abigail & Van Asselt, Joanna, 2015. "Enhancing food security in South Sudan: The role of public food stocks and cereal imports:," IFPRI discussion papers 1482, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  • Handle: RePEc:fpr:ifprid:1482
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Boysen, Ole & Matthews, Alan, 2012. "The differentiated effects of food price spikes on poverty in Uganda," 123rd Seminar, February 23-24, 2012, Dublin, Ireland 122445, European Association of Agricultural Economists.
    2. Ahmed, Raisuddin & Haggblade, Steven & Chowdhury, Tawfiq-e-Elahi (ed.), 2000. "Out of the shadow of famine: evolving food markets and food policy in Bangladesh," IFPRI books, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI), number 0-8018-6476-3, September.
    3. Rashid, Shahidur & Gulati, Ashok & Cummings, Ralph Jr., 2008. "From parastatals to private trade: Lessons from Asian agriculture," Issue briefs 50, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
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    8. del Ninno, Carlo & Dorosh, Paul A. & Subbarao, Kalanidhi, 2007. "Food aid, domestic policy and food security: Contrasting experiences from South Asia and sub-Saharan Africa," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 32(4), pages 413-435, August.
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    Keywords

    food security; trade; food policy; agriculture; armed conflicts; productivity; imports; demand; sorghum; maize; rice; food stocks; resilience; cereals;

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