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The differentiated effects of food price spikes on poverty in Uganda

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  • Boysen, Ole
  • Matthews, Alan

Abstract

This paper applies an integrated CGE-microsimulation model to analyse the impact of the 2006-08 increase in commodity prices on Uganda. Previous impact analysis studies suggested that the food price shock increased poverty in Uganda as there are more net food buyer than net food seller households. We show that the agriculture commodity price shocks were poverty-reducing, but the simultaneous increases in energy and fertiliser prices were poverty-increasing. Overall, poverty decreased in Uganda as a result of external price shocks in the 2006-08 period.

Suggested Citation

  • Boysen, Ole & Matthews, Alan, 2012. "The differentiated effects of food price spikes on poverty in Uganda," 123rd Seminar, February 23-24, 2012, Dublin, Ireland 122445, European Association of Agricultural Economists.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:eaa123:122445
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    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/122445
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Ole Boysen & Alan Matthews, 2009. "The Economic Partnership Agreement between Uganda and the EU: Trade and Poverty Impacts," The Institute for International Integration Studies Discussion Paper Series iiisdp307, IIIS.
    2. Marcel Fafchamps & Ruth Vargas Hill & Aliziki Kaudha & Robert Waggwa Nsibirwa, 2003. "The transmission of international commodity prices to domestic producers," CSAE Working Paper Series 2003-14, Centre for the Study of African Economies, University of Oxford.
    3. Ivanic, Maros & Martin, Will, 2008. "Implications of higher global food prices for poverty in low-income countries," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4594, The World Bank.
    4. Alberto Zezza & Benjamin Davis & Carlo Azzarri & Katia Covarrubias & Luca Tasciotti & Gustavo Anriquez, 2008. "The Impact of Rising Food Prices on the Poor," Working Papers 08-07, Agricultural and Development Economics Division of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO - ESA).
    5. Hertel, Thomas & Hummels, David & Ivanic, Maros & Keeney, Roman, 2007. "How confident can we be of CGE-based assessments of Free Trade Agreements?," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 24(4), pages 611-635, July.
    6. Ole Boysen, 2016. "Food Demand Characteristics in Uganda: Estimation and Policy Relevance," South African Journal of Economics, Economic Society of South Africa, vol. 84(2), pages 260-293, June.
    7. Todd Benson & Samuel Mugarura & Kelly Wanda, 2008. "Impacts in Uganda of rising global food prices: the role of diversified staples and limited price transmission," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 39(s1), pages 513-524, November.
    8. Sébastien Dessus & Santiago Herrera & Rafael de Hoyos, 2008. "The impact of food inflation on urban poverty and its monetary cost: some back-of-the-envelope calculations," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 39(s1), pages 417-429, November.
    9. Simler, Kenneth R., 2010. "The short-term impact of higher food prices on poverty in Uganda," Policy Research Working Paper Series 5210, The World Bank.
    10. Wodon, Quentin & Tsimpo, Clarence & Backiny-Yetna, Prospere & Joseph, George & Adoho, Franck & Coulombe, Harold, 2008. "Potential impact of higher food prices on poverty : summary estimates for a dozen west and central African countries," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4745, The World Bank.
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    Cited by:

    1. Dorosh, Paul A. & Rashid, Shahidur & Childs, Abigail & Van Asselt, Joanna, 2015. "Enhancing food security in South Sudan: The role of public food stocks and cereal imports:," IFPRI discussion papers 1482, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    2. Séne, Ligane Massamba, 2014. "Heterogeneous responses to heterogeneous food price shocks in Senegal: insights from a CGE," MPRA Paper 58835, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Van Campenhout, Bjorn & Pauw, Karl & Minot, Nicholas, 2013. "The impact of food prices shocks in Uganda: First-order versus long-run effects:," IFPRI discussion papers 1284, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Food price shock; Uganda; microsimulation; poverty; International Development; Risk and Uncertainty; O55; Q18.;

    JEL classification:

    • O55 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - Africa

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